We noticed that you're using an unsupported browser. The TripAdvisor website may not display properly.We support the following browsers:
Windows: Internet Explorer, Mozilla Firefox, Google Chrome. Mac: Safari.
Open today: 9:00 am - 5:00 pm
Save
Review Highlights
"Interesting Materials, Well Displayed"

Attractively displayed folk art items from the Appalachian Foothills of Eastern Kentucky. From... read more

Reviewed 3 October 2018
YumFinder1
,
Morehead, Kentucky
Rare gem not to be missed

Stopped in the museum on our first trip to Morehead. What a find! This is a small museum... read more

Reviewed 26 September 2018
Tom K
Read all 31 reviews
  
Reviews (31)
Filter reviews
31 results
Traveller rating
21
8
2
0
0
Traveller type
Time of year
LanguageAll languages
21
8
2
0
0
Show reviews that mention
All reviews gift shop is free admission small museum for sale folk art center primitive carvings rendition collection appalachian
Filter
Updating list...
7 - 12 of 31 reviews
Reviewed 12 March 2018

This was an absolute lovely stop in Morehead... purchased several small items. The art display was incredible and they allowed us to take pictures! Very friendly staff.

Date of experience: March 2018
Thank Janie M
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Matt C, Manager at Kentucky Folk Art Center, responded to this reviewResponded 14 March 2018

I'm glad you enjoyed your visit to our museum. If you ever need any more items like the ones that you purchased, please call or email. We hope you come back to see us again.

Report response as inappropriate
This response is the subjective opinion of the management representative and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 7 December 2017 via mobile

I love Appalachian woodcarving, especially Edgar and Donnie Tolson from Compton. Donnie’s carving of Edgar is a masterpiece. Nice collection and staff. Highly recommended.

Date of experience: June 2017
Thank photolandscape
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Matt C, Manager at Kentucky Folk Art Center, responded to this reviewResponded 14 March 2018

Yes, Edgar Tolson and his son, Donny, are two of Kentucky's great wood carvers. We're preparing to put more of Edgar's work on display, so be sure to come see us again.

Report response as inappropriate
This response is the subjective opinion of the management representative and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 14 September 2017 via mobile

This place is weird, but it is fun to look through. Since it is free it's definitely worth a visit. The gift shop is full of conversation starters

Date of experience: September 2017
1  Thank Kristina F
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Matt C, Manager at Kentucky Folk Art Center, responded to this reviewResponded 14 March 2018

Yes, folk art can be weird, but we're happy you had fun.

Report response as inappropriate
This response is the subjective opinion of the management representative and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 10 August 2017

If you are interested in American folk art or art in general, this is a must-see museum. The collection of Kentucky folk art is outstanding. Great Earnest Patton, Edgar Tolson and other pieces. Donny Tolson's carving of his father Edgar is one of the finest works I have ever seen from this region (or anywhere else for that matter).

Date of experience: June 2017
Thank photolandscape
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Management response:Responded 10 August 2017

I am glad you enjoyed our museum, particularly our fine collection of wood carvings by the Tolsons and the other "Red River carvers."

Report response as inappropriate
This response is the subjective opinion of the management representative and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 8 August 2017 via mobile

Okay, I'm not a rabid fan, much less student, of any art and my museum experiences are the high end vacation type such as in Europe as a soldier or various Smithsonian vestiges in DC that all had tour guides to explain things. So this wouldn't be a first choice stop for me, but I had an hour to kill and I was bored. Thus, I stopped, parked and went in.

To start, I wasn't sure if I could have defined "folk art" before my visit and not sure I'd get it right if I tried now. But the desk folks were polite, if preoccupied, when I arrived. They gave me a postcard that explained folk art a little then left me to wonder the two small floors alone. They didn't admonish me not to touch anything and some things really invite a tactile experience.

After I was done the desk people asked what I thought and liked and we had a short discussion before I left.

My conclusion is that you don't need any talent or skill as such to create this art...the materials seem to be composing a piece from whatever is at hand in a manner you most enjoy or can work with without getting hurt.

The art part seems to be in what the creator sees while working or is attempting to portray with their end result. Frankly, some of it was no more impressive or impactful than my grandkids pasta mosaics...maybe less so. But there WERE a few pieces where, as I stared, touched and imagined making myself that I could nod and say, "I get this one. I can feel it's meaning," or at least why they bothered. A couple of pieces were even pretty.

If it's really hot or cold out and your bored, or between appointments, or need a quiet place to meetup or speak with someone without paying admission or feel like sitting down, this would fit the bill.

As for a destination, I'd really put some thought into that first. The three little groups that came in just before me or at the same time were all gone within 10 mins. I was there about 40 mins, bit I was trying hard to "get it."

I rated it average because I can't think of anyone I'd personally want to share it with and it left me with no lasting impression or desire to ever go back.

But, hey...what does an old Army grunt and biker know about art...? Your mileage might vary...greatly.

Date of experience: June 2017
1  Thank vtxcagesc
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Management response:Responded 10 August 2017

Thanks for your visit and response.

We didn't recommend that you not touch the artwork because you are an adult, and we assume that adults know not to touch things in museums. There are also numerous "no touching" signs in our gallery, which you may have, somehow, missed.

Secondly, we don't offer unscheduled tours to individual visitors because admission is always free, and our museum is small with only two full-time staff members. The greeters are typically students from our university. However, if the Director or Educator are available, we are always happy to answer questions, and we do so several times each day. We also provide numerous informational panels for visitors.

If you want to learn more about folk art and why it is important, particularly in Appalachia and the south, feel free to review the exhibition catalogs on our website. As a simple explanation, there are hotbeds for folk art scattered around America. The most notable are in Kentucky/Appalachia, the Mississippi Delta, and the southwest. These are folk art hotbeds, because they are the most historically impoverished regions of our nation. People there who were interested in art never had the opportunity to pursue formal training, and most began making art in the second halves of their lives after a significant life change of some sort. This resulted in some (though not all) of the artists adopting primitive styles. Other times, as with some woodcarvers, stylistic decisions can be an outgrowth of community traditions. Therefore, when judging folk one should not always rely on the perceived technical proficiency of the artist, but rather examine the overall expressiveness of the work.

Report response as inappropriate
This response is the subjective opinion of the management representative and not of TripAdvisor LLC
View more reviews