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Important Historical site for BOTH countries!

I pedal here regularly, and have camped (and wrecked!) here, in addition bringing visitors to this... read more

Reviewed 15 July 2017
Juanito_Hayburg
,
El Paso, Texas
HISTORY ALIVE!

To be standing inside the house were some of the revolution heroes lived and discuss civil war... read more

Reviewed 1 June 2016
SummerTraveler67
,
Richmond, California
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Reviewed 5 December 2013

I couldn't have been more pleased with my annual Irene's Biketour 2013 (re-routed from certain truncation East of Hueco Mountain due to severe Winter weather), which was whittled from six to one overnight, took me from my home in El PasoTX-USA into the lower valley through San Eli, Fabens, and across the port of entry at CazetaMX. After a great overnight in Parque Reforma, I woke up the rooters and continued pedaling my Doublevision North on Ruta Dos, enjoying much-needed hot java at the Museo in San Agustin and had a good lookabout, guided by no less than curator Professor Manuel Robles! This was GREAT! However, what really made my day was arriving at Casa de Adobe, which shares one of the most historically significant (and neglected site on the USA side) boundaries on Earth. The Mexcians have made this area an extremely wonderful place to visit, just by virtue of it's historical significance. You won't find any fast-food nearby (unless a food-truck happens to be present, along with large numbers of other people who might be swimming, sunning, or just relaxing. Or one chico getting his bloodied foot bandaged by me--but that didn't stop him from jumping in the Rio Bravo immediately thereafter!) or bathrooms, but you will find a few trees, sheltering the foundation of the original building, Boundary Marker #1, US Border Patrol carefully watching the area, signs advising all persons about the border (in Spanish; you have to cross the border to see it in English), a carreta, bust of Sr. Madero, the Mexican flag (of course) proudly atop the pole, and a snug 2-room adobe building. One aspect is that this is a place that marks the junction of two countries (USA & USM) and three states (Chihuahua, Texas, New Mexico), currently the site of 2 brick factories as well as this Casa de Adobe. I was extremely fortunate in that my progress had been good; my arrival at this Northernmost point on the border was mid-afternoon Tuesday 26NOV2013, was excellent as docent Alfredo gave me a personalized tour. This relatively new reproduction of the original structure was symbolic of the intense collaboration 16APR-21MAY1911 between well-educated politician Francisco Madero (USM President 1911-1913; assassinated) and poorly educated but charismatic "Pancho" Villa in the Plan de San Luis. Here is where the near future of Mexico was determined, between individuals competing for power. It historical fact that once any individual became numero uno, others seek to unseat that individual--past, present, and likely well into the future, around the World. My goal, obviously much less radical, is to upgrade this entire area from an challenging access, derelict (USA side) site into a non-motorized (specifically for bicycles, especially Doublevisions!) international port of entry. Such a creation would be beneficial economically for all entrepreneurs of both countries, but it would attract all persons (and there are millions) who could more easily visit this immensely important site. Until that future time, you can only access Casa de Adobe from the Mexican side, South of the border, and if you journey there from the USA, you MUST have a passport/passcard to efficiently return.

1  Thank Juanito_Hayburg
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 12 June 2013

Did you know that the Mexican Revolution was headquartered for a month in Ciudad Juarez, right on the border between Texas, New Mexico and the Mexican state of Chihuahua? Well, it was headquarted in this little adobe house, reconstructed and made into a museum with period-artifacts (not from the original house). There is a historian who works there part time who speaks (limited) English, so even if you don't speak Spanish, it is worth a visit.
The historian is only there from 10am-3pm (check the Facebook page because I think that is subject to change), so make sure to go when you can get into the house. Otherwise, the house will be closed. You can still walk around the property, but you won't get nearly as much information about the revolution.
Also, don't be afraid to ask about the current situation. The caretaker is willing to talk about what goes on in this area now, and is quite interesting to hear.

5  Thank rayecheal
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 27 March 2018 via mobile
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This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 14 March 2017
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This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 20 February 2017
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This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
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