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Serene setting for vermillion temple

We arrived here early via Kita Omiya Station and traversing Omiya Park. Temple is in a flat... read more

Reviewed 13 August 2018
Michelle C
,
Yokosuka, Japan
Romantic Atmosphere ,good for couple or dating couple

peaceful place for couple and good stuff for loving belief... read more

Reviewed 18 July 2017
pangpipo
,
Bangkok, Thailand
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1 - 10 of 13 reviews
Reviewed 13 August 2018

We arrived here early via Kita Omiya Station and traversing Omiya Park. Temple is in a flat setting. They have a temple office where they allow you to watch them do calligraphy in temple stamp book for 500 yen. However if you approach from Higawa Ryokuchi Park for a longer walk the payoff is even better. This attraction has parking. Seems to open earlier than 9am in the summer, as a lot of people were out and about.

Thank Michelle C
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 24 March 2018

Hikawa Shrine is said to have a history of more than 2400 years and is one of the oldest shrines in Japan which also became the origin of the place name of Omiya as a "great shrine". Hikawa Shrine gathers faith in the Kanto region as Musashi Ichinomiya (means "top shrine of Musashi"), and the New Year's Shrine is crowded with many visitors.
Musashi was a former province of Japan, which today comprises Tokyo Metropolis, most of Saitama Prefecture and part of Kanagawa Prefecture.

Shrines with the name of Hikawa Shrine counts in Omiya, Saitama, Tokyo, Kanagawa prefecture, and its number is 280 members.
The approach of Hikawa Shrine extends 2 km north and south from the Nakasendo, and there are beautiful zelkova trees lined on both sides.
The Nakasendo was one of the five main routes of the Edo period, and one of the two that connected Edo (modern-day Tokyo) to Kyoto in Japan.

The Torii of Hikawa Shrine has first Torii gate, second Torii, and third Torii in the approach road called Omotesando. The largest one is second torii, and the former is a Torii which was the big Torii of Meiji Jingu Shrine.
A Torii is a traditional Japanese gate most commonly found at the entrance of or within a shrine.

Thank JugemJugem
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 18 July 2017

peaceful place for couple and good stuff for loving belief. คู่รักที่อยากไปขอให้มีความสัมพันธ์ที่ยืนยาวกันไปนานๆแนะนำที่นี่ค่ะ บรรยากาศดี ดูสงบเงียบและโรแมนติกขลังไปอีกแบบ

1  Thank pangpipo
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 30 April 2017

Very quiet and not crowded place (only on weekend more people) , not must see but if you are nearby you should see it

Thank Pat I
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 5 January 2017

I was surprised to walk on the long straight entrance path to the shrine. The area is wide and there are several smaller shrines apart from the main one.
The nearest JR station is Ohmiya and it takes just 30-45 minutes from Central Tokyo by train and from the station, about 20 minutes on foot. After following main road from the east exit turn left. Everybody knows where it is so you can ask anybody to help you. Avoid Jan 1 through 7 as tehre are so many people and cars visiting. I forgot to add that there were a stone monument explaing the relation with the famous warship Musashi. The branch shrine of this shrine had been installed in Musashi.

Thank Keizo
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 15 October 2016

very peaceful and kindness place, where do you have the chance to see how japanese people pray and deal with their costumes.

Thank Leonardo P
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 6 October 2016 via mobile

It was a peaceful shrine with a park near by, very quiet and not crowded at all, perfect to start the day peacefully

Thank FrequentFlier640620
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 22 May 2016

Lots of activity to watch here with a wedding and birth celebrations going on. Lovely place to walk around and take photos plus out back there is a beautiful river ad bridge to see.

Thank David H
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 10 January 2016

Musashi Ichinomiya Hikawa Shrine (武蔵一宮氷川神社, Musashi Ichinomiya Hikawa Jinja) is a popular shrine in Saitama City, a 20-30 minute walk from Omiya Station. As its name suggests ("Musashi Ichinomiya" literally means "top shrine of Musashi"), this shrine used to be the head Shinto shrine of former Musashi Province, which covered present day Greater Tokyo, including large parts of Saitama Prefecture. It is this shrine which gave Omiya (which literally means "great shrine") its name.

The shrine is set in lush greenery and has many auxiliary buildings on its grounds. A long approach from the south leads to the shrine's precincts, where a tall vermillion torii gate and several secondary shrines are located. Proceeding north takes visitors to a bridge across a pond. Here, the two-storied Romon Gate marks the entrance to the main shrine grounds, where the main hall (honden), the praying hall (haiden) and a dance stage (maiden) stand.

Musashi Ichinomiya is the most important of the many branches of Hikawa Shrines in Japan, which enshrine Susanoo, the God of the sea and storms. Additional structures have been added to the shrine during its history and its current main buildings date back to 1940. For most of the year, this shrine has a tranquil environment. However, during special occasions, such as during hatsumode (first visit to a shrine on New Year ), it becomes one of the most visited shrines in Japan.

Hikawa Shrine is a ten minute walk from Kita Omiya Station (2 minutes, 150 yen from Omiya Station by Tobu Noda Line). Alternatively, it can be reached in a 20-30 minute walk from Omiya Station.

1  Thank Experience804117
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 14 May 2015

I will admit I learned more than the average tourist due to my translator assigned to me from the company I was there to train. Having someone that has some knowledge and can translate is a major bonus. This shrine was very busy and I would guess there are guided tours. If not, I found the school age kids very helpful at the train stations and I am sure they would be here as well. The kids are required to take English in school and most likely are excited to report back at school that they actually spoke to an American in English. I took about 30 to 40 photos at the shrine alone but you must be patient to get a clear shot because of all the visitors. Very worth while visit but get a tour guide if possible or check with your hotel staff about a translator/guide to make it far more interesting.

Thank Jeff H
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
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