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Road trip in Norway

2 posts
Road trip in Norway

Hi everyone.

I'm trying to plan a 10-day road trip in Norway(June 14 - June 24), involving at least a hike to trolltongue and a day spent in Oslo and Bergen. Here is my route:

Part 1: https://goo.gl/maps/bKaBHt3f44Q2

Part 2: https://goo.gl/maps/kCcceyeWCpJ2

The questions are:

a) can someone look at the route and let me know if it is realistic or not?

b) is there any way I can calculate the overall cost of the trip? Gas, ferry tolls, any other kind of tolls along the way

c) I know that camping is allowed literally anywhere except some cases, but how about parking? For example, I would like to stop next to Goksjø lake(59.176118, 10.141537), but on google maps street view I cannot find any car parking space of any kind except some kind of a building that looks like a ferry (https://goo.gl/maps/iUFU6xFpQp82). SO, what do I do? Do I just stop on the grass, or ride in to the ferrys backyard?

d) Similar question regarding camp fires. Am I right in my assumption that I can burn fires anywhere as long as I am not close to a forest? If so, do I have a legal right to gather firewood?

Thank you. Arthem

8 replies to this topic
Oslo, Norway
Destination Expert
for Norway, Oslo
Level Contributor
17,775 posts
36 reviews
1. Re: Road trip in Norway

Lets clear up a couple of misconceptions first.

No, you can’t camp literally anywhere. The right to roam is for hikers in the wilderness, not drivers trying to save a bit of money. Camp far from habitation and roads - https:/… and remember that driving off-road is not permitted.

You cannot light fires in summer except very special circumstances and places - https:/…

Open Norwegian sites in Chrome browser for translation.

https:/…

Norway
Level Contributor
2,329 posts
21 reviews
2. Re: Road trip in Norway

Like Dyoll mentions, it is DEFINITELY not allowed to light camp fires anywhere. The risks of forest fires can be very high many places. The general rule is that it is prohibited to light camp fires between April 15th and September 15th without a permit. The only exceptions to this acording to the current regulations is if it happens "where it can not possibly cause a fire", in other words in an already established camp fire site. It is very important that these rules are respected to avoid damaging wild fires.

And again: Camping is DEFINITELY not "allowed literally anywhere", that is a big misconception, sorry.

The "right to roam" is, like dyoll mentions, intended for hikers in the wilderness, not for car tourists that wants to wild camp. And you can not camp anywhere in populated areas or in agricultural areas or on cultivated land of any kind. And even in the wilderness you have to stay at least 150 meters from any buildings. This means that you may have trouble finding a legal place to camp in many areas, since there will be populated areas and farms covering wide areas. Please also do not block established rest areas along the road by camping there, this is not popular.

It is difficult to make any specific comments on the route, as you have given no specific about what you want to do and why you have chosen this particular route. Note that if you follow the southern coast you will be populated areas or famland most of the time. This route will be vey different when it comes to scenery than going inland across any of the mountains.

There is nowhere I know of where you can clacluate all trip costs. The fuel costs can be easily calculated from the number of kilometers driven once you have an estimate of how much your car consumes.

For ferries, google each ferry crossing to find information. You only seems to have two ferry crossings, so it will not make a significant impact on the overall budget. The smaller ferry crossings normally will cost in the region from 70-100 NOK for a car with driver.

For road tolls, use this map: http://www.vegvesen.no/trafikk You have to select "Bomstasjoner" to the the toll points.

Harstad, Norway
Destination Expert
for Bergen, Norway
Level Contributor
33,270 posts
41 reviews
3. Re: Road trip in Norway

ViaMichelin travel planner can give you some approximate costs on tolls and fuel.

2 posts
4. Re: Road trip in Norway

Thank you for your answer. If I may I would like to get your comments on the following guidelines posted on https:/….

1) "The right to roam applies to open country, sometimes also known as "unfenced land", which is land that is not cultivated. In Norway, the term covers most shores, bogs, forests and mountains. Small islands of uncultivated land within cultivated land are not regarded as open country."

It does not apply to “fenced land”, which is private, and includes cultivated land, such as ploughed fields with or without crops, meadows, pastures and gardens, as well as young plantations, building plots and industrial areas.

Am I reading it wrong? This is what I got from this guide - Yea, I can't put a tent in the middle of Oslo or somewhere in some farmers plantations, but everything else like shores of a lake or just a random forest near the road should be ok. I am interested not because I try to save a couple of bucks on lodging, but because I don't like too many people around, and campsites may be busy during the summer time.

2) Campfires in or near forests are prohibited from the 15th of April to the 15th of September. They are nevertheless allowed in places where fire hazard is unlikely, as by the sea. Never leave an open fire before you have ensured that it is fully extinguished. Take care not to cause any other damage.

Again, how I understand it - if you see trees, bushes or dry grass then no, you CANNOT make a fire there. If all you see is water or some sandy ground(or a parking lot?) then since fire is highly unlikely there then I CAN make a fire there, right? If so, can i gather dry wood from fallen trees somewhere in the forest, and then come to a beach to make a fire?

Is the guide wrong or am I reading it wrong? What kind of fire permit are we talking about? Where can I get one?

On the separate note - 'It is difficult to make any specific comments on the route, as you have given no specific about what you want to do and why you have chosen this particular route'.

My bad, I should have been more specific. This route was chosen for 3 major reasons

1) We want to see "different' Norway. I tried to find a route which goes along the coast and in the mountains, so we can experience both.

2) 2 largest cities by population are Oslo and Bergen, so it makes sense for me that visiting those two cities would be worthwhile.

3) I tried to fit as much of "scenic" highways as I could from this guide - https:/…

Ideally we would like to spend 1 day in Oslo, and 1 day in Bergen, leaving 8 days for a 2K trip.

I would also like to avoid spending entire day in the car. Is it too much for a no-hassle trip? Or too little? Hard to predict road conditions given the ferries and swirly mountain roads. Maybe you know a more "scenic" route for us to take?

Harstad, Norway
Destination Expert
for Bergen, Norway
Level Contributor
33,270 posts
41 reviews
5. Re: Road trip in Norway

"Fenced land" is a wide term and not necessarily fenced. Most land is private and a lot of land is cultivated, especially along rivers and lakes. Some beaches are protected nature reserves where camping is not allowed. There is no general permit - you ask permission from the landowner. Beware of tics.

Making a fire at a parking lot and you will have the fire brigades and police there pronto !

Norway
Level Contributor
2,329 posts
21 reviews
6. Re: Road trip in Norway

Part of the reason we are being a bit defensive about the "right to roam" is that in some popular areas there are sometimes just too many "car wild campers" along the roads and in places you can reach by car, so it becomes a problem in itself for many reasons, pollution, garbage, destruction and wear on nature etc. etc. Also, some travellers seem to "strech the rules" a bit, camping in places that create some annoyance among local population.

In many areas you may not really find a wide selection of suitable camp spots that are within the rules, this would in particular apply for most areas in the lowlands, since it is often either partly built-up areas intermixed with farmland, even in rural areas. While Norway may be thinly populated, the population is realtively evenly distributed over much of the country, there are people living all over the place, in particular in the low lands. High up in the mountains it may be easier to find undisturbed spots along the road, more true wilderness. The south coast is a popular vacation area for Norwegians, so along lakes and the coast there may be a lot of cabins and summer houses, which are also applicable for the 150 meter distance rule.

The lowlands areas that are not built up or cultivated tend to be heavily covered in vegetation, so this may make finding suitable spots difficult some times. Also, like klimaflyktning mentions, be aware that these areas may be ridden with ticks which can be a problem. Ticks are mainly a problem in the lowlands, not at high altitude.

As for campfires, it is corrrect that you can possibly light small fires for example on a beach if it is far from any vegetation and you are sure it is not causing any permnent destruction of nature. One thing to be aware of in particular: Please do not make any camp fires directly on solid smooth rock faces (what is known as "svaberg" in Norwegian), as a high temperature fire will leave permanent marks on the rocks that will stay there forwever.

As for permits, this is something you apply for at local fire departments if you for exemple want to burn a bonfire on mid summer night. So this may not be very applicable for tourists, as it is related to a particular location and a particular time.

I think your route is OK as such with the number of days you have available. I have not calculated the distances in details, by just looking at it I would assume it is within reason when it comes to driving distances each day.

Oslo
Level Contributor
17,394 posts
94 reviews
7. Re: Road trip in Norway

Wild camping is allowed for hikers in the wilderness. Note that camping in the wild (for hikers) is permitted according to the "Outdoor recreation act".

As mentioned above: Land in Norway is mostly private, so the permission to camp in the wilderness means that you are a guest that gets something for free. For instance my family owns a notable chunk of wilderness, including a valley, forest, some lakes and waterfalls etc. Everyone is free to hike there and camp, but not to drive in a motor vehicle, to break or take anything. We are of course happy that hikers visit Our small Kingdom, and make an effort to prepare Nice trails etc.

Even a Public road through the wilderness is surrounded by private land, only the road itself is government or Public property.

Oslo
Level Contributor
17,394 posts
94 reviews
8. Re: Road trip in Norway

In summer the general rule is not to make open fire at all. When land is dry even grass, moss and heather can burn. And because land is private all wood and trees are basically private property.

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