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Picture taking

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Manila
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20 posts
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Picture taking

Hi, one of my hobbies is photography so I lug my big camera around all the time. I want take as many photos as I can and being in one of the most picturesque cities in the world I will be very trigger happy. My question is, can I bring my camera inside the museums and theaters (we are going to watch Phantom of the Opera and Lion King) and how safe is it to bring a "big" camera around in streets of central London?

London
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23 posts
60 reviews
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1. Re: Picture taking

Yes you can bring the camera into these places, but you will be limited on what you can take photos of. The theaters are very strict regarding no photos, as are most of the museums.

It should be safe with the camera on the streets, but as for any big city, be careful with it on the tube and in crowds.

Ambler, Pennsylvania
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982 posts
44 reviews
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2. Re: Picture taking

Hi: Many attractions restrict photography... from allowed with no flash to no photography at all. So, you really need to look for signs or ask the staff at each attraction. Many places have a locker room where you can stash your stuff, so you can lock up your camera if you can't take photos.

Lots of people carry their cameras while wandering through London. You should not have a problem with that. Like anything else of value, don't leave it unattended.

London, England
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7,775 posts
76 reviews
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3. Re: Picture taking

Many museums will ask you to leave your camera at the cloakroom and ost theatres ban photography all together.

London, like any major city has its element of crime, but as long as you are vigilant you should be OK.

West London
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10,128 posts
2 reviews
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4. Re: Picture taking

Will you be bringing a tripod with you? The only problem might be community support officers (amateur policemen) wrongly telling you that you aren't allowed to take photos at various places - if you look like a "professional" photographer to them then they might try to stop you taking photos at various locations, even in Trafalgar Square for example. They'd be wrong but just be relaxed about it.

You can't take photos in most London theatres - just like you can't take photos in McDonalds restaurants, i.e. for copyright reasons. Or because the sound of your camera might distract the rest of the audience or the cast. However, you can take photos in most of the main museums, including the British Museum.

It would be a good idea to join flickr, which is free, and post this message on one of their London forums; or even arrange a stroll around London with London photographers.

Have a look at

http://www.flickr.com/groups/londinium/

and

www.flickr.com/groups/londonflickrmeetups/

Mesa, Arizona
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9,998 posts
7 reviews
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5. Re: Picture taking

Outside photography, I'm guessing no restrictions to speak of. Inside, you can check websites and they usually have photo restrictions listed.

I know that museums in the USA MAY allow photography WITHOUT flash but NO photos of special exhibits (or costumes).

I would check websites/email institutions for restrictions.

I remember YEARS ago I wanted to go to sit in on a session of court at Old Bailey (I think that's where it was).. We could not even bring CAMERAS into the courtroom. I had to go all the way back to my hotel at Russell Square to drop off the camera.

I did read something about no flash photos on underground. but I'd check the restrictions there anyway.

London
Destination Expert
for Thirassia, Fira
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13,227 posts
16 reviews
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6. Re: Picture taking

No to flash on underground / train stations. Despite these rules, I have seen idiots use flash to an incoming tube train.

urban75.org/photos/photographers-rights-tube…

Los Angeles...
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233 posts
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7. Re: Picture taking

I was pleasantly surprised to see that photography was allowed in the big museums - British Museum, Museum of London, V&A and the Science Museum all allowed me to click happily away, including with flash. The large religious houses - Westminster Abbey and St. Paul's Cathedral, did not allow it. However I found that many religous insitutions outside of London did allow photography - I took photos at York Minster, Bath Abbey, Salisbury Cathedral and St. Giles in Edinburgh. At Canterbury Cathedral I was able to purchase a photo pass for £2 which gave me a name tag like label to attach to my jacket to show I was allowed tp take photos in the cathedral, not that anybody actually checked it once I was inside.

Greeley
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10 posts
2 reviews
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8. Re: Picture taking

I used to resent photo prohibitions, but now I almost welcome them. I over-click, and tend at times to see everything through a view finder. When I'm told I can't take pictures, I get a bit twitchy, but then have a little chat with myself and relax and enjoy it. I go through a few mintues of "this is how I'd frame this shot", and "oh, if I only had my camera" to just living in the moment... and finding that I compose descriptions in my head... in words instead of images.

Apparently, I'm a bit obsessive-compulsive. But being without a camera now and again is a good thing.

surrey
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682 posts
114 reviews
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9. Re: Picture taking

"The only problem might be community support officers (amateur policemen) wrongly telling you that you aren't allowed to take photos at various places"

PCSO's are actually Police Staff - ie employees of the Police force that employs them - they are certainly not amateur - in fact in my experience, they exist in a number of other countries in various guises.

Edited: 31 March 2011, 06:43
Manila
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20 posts
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10. Re: Picture taking

Thanks everyone for the links and replys. I do carry a professional digital camera and a tripod so surely I'm going to attract a bit of attention support officers, I hope they will be kind enough to let me collect memories. I'm glad to know that big museums allow photographs and I understand why they don't allow it inside the theaters and religious places. However, my concern is the safety of my equipment if I leave at the cloak room. Is it secure? Will they allow me to bring it inside if I promise them not to take photos? :-b