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Dewayne P wrote a review Nov. 2020
Elizabethtown, Kentucky1,118 contributions257 helpful votes
I didn't get to take the tour because the house was closed; however, is nice enough just walking the grounds and reading the signs. It is a really neat property and the house itself looks well preserved. There is limited free parking on site and it is a marginal fee to take the tour when it is open once Covid is not as big a factor.
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Date of experience: November 2020
2 Helpful votes
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Lewis E wrote a review Apr. 2019
3 contributions
Nice place to visit and learn about local history. The house needs some repairs but is furnished nicely with period and some original furniture.
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Date of experience: April 2019
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ladylawyer2u wrote a review Sep. 2017
Memphis, Tennessee6 contributions1 helpful vote
I happened to end up in Gallatin, TN for an overnight stay. There really wasn't a lot going on in Gallatin - not much at all to see and do. One place, however that I had an interest in was Trousdale Place. I arrived there at a time of morning when the house should have been open; however, there was a sign that said it is shown by appointment only. Seeing this sign left me feeling more than a little disappointed. Most likely, all of the local residents who want to see the house have already seen it; therefore, there probably are not enough tours from local people to pay to keep the ho use open. I guess the management never considered, however, that there may be others who want to see the house who are not locals, and who don 't know ahead of time about the requirement for an appointment to be made. This is very unfair to those who might just be traveling through, as was I, to get there and find they can't see it. Thank goodness I didn't go to Gallatin for this specific purpose. What a shame. Not only do many tourists miss out on the chance to see the house, but the house misses the chance to collect a little extra money to help maintain and keep it up. When the locals stop going there completely, and when the tourists through there can't get in without an appointment, it will be sad to see the house fall into a state of ruins due to there being no money.
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Date of experience: September 2017
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Response from TrousdalePlace, Public Relations Manager at Trousdale Place
Responded 4 Oct. 2017
Trousdale Place is privately owned. At present, there is one volunteer docent who is not local to Gallatin thus requiring an appointment-only tour. By calling the number listed for the property, a voice message will advise you on the next scheduled tour. Please be aware, due to recent on-going renovations, the house is not on a regular schedule at this time. Although it will not be possible for Trousdale Place to be open 7 days a week on a regular schedule, our future plans do include more opportunities for the public to view our historic home. Please refer to our website for additional information.
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DrMarc9491 wrote a review Jan. 2017
Franklin, Kentucky3,682 contributions312 helpful votes
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While traveling through Gallatin, Tennessee, on my way to Kentucky, I came across the historic mansion of Trousdale Place. This is a two-story Federal-style brick structure with staggered Flemish-bond brickwork. I came upon it by chance for it is nestled between other building along the main street of Gallatin (just a short distance from the Gallatin United Methodist Church. If you like American history, and interesting facts about the Civil War, Trousdale Place should be on your list of places to visit. The house was built by J. Bowen in 1813, but upon his passing away in 1822, the home was purchased by William Trousdale (who later became the Governor of Tennessee). In 1899 the home was deeded to a local chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy. A Confederate monument was placed on the front lawn in 1903. If you want a public tour of the home, you must make an appointment. Inside the home is original Trousdale furniture (quite unique). Also, the home contains a small library on the Confederacy. Bring your camera for ground shots and comfortable walking shoes. Dr. Marc, PS 63:7
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Date of experience: January 2017
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