Qorikancha
Historic SitesAncient RuinsReligious Sites
8:30 AM - 5:30 PM
Monday
8:30 AM - 5:30 PM
Tuesday
8:30 AM - 5:30 PM
Wednesday
8:30 AM - 5:30 PM
Thursday
8:30 AM - 5:30 PM
Friday
8:30 AM - 5:30 PM
Saturday
8:30 AM - 5:30 PM
Sunday
2:00 PM - 5:00 PM
About
This ruin was once the most important temple of the Incas, which was later used as a base for the Church of Santo Domingo when the Spanish conquered the city.
Duration: 2-3 hours
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  • David M
    St. Albans, United Kingdom7 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Fascinating site
    This site is a really interesting mix of Spanish and Inca architecture and a must-see in Cusco. I didn't take a guided tour and sadly the information is pretty lacking if you don't. There is a little pamphlet with some info that you can request and QR codes that lead to scanned documents on a Facebook page, which I found pretty tricky to access (when I could even get the code to be recognised on my phone), as I font have a FB account. It seems it's not possible to join a tour once they've entered the site, so I would recommend booking in advance or approaching a tour guide with a red lanyard who hang around outside. However I think I saw more of the site than those who had a guide, as they didn't seem to visit the upper levels at all, which are all Spanish/Catholic history but include the stunning choir with a view over the church, and the bell tower with views over Cusco (which costs 5 soles extra). The conventional wisdom with these sites is to visit early to avoid the rush, but it is absolutely heaving at opening time (9am). You can barely move for the massive tour groups, let alone get decent photos. I strongly recommend visiting after about 11am as it was pretty empty by then and much more peaceful.
    Visited September 2023
    Travelled solo
    Written 9 September 2023
  • TheExplorerFamily
    Somerset, New Jersey7,106 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    An Amazingly Knowledgeable Visit
    This was the most important Temple in the Inca Empire, and was built in 1438 at the meeting place of two large rivers. The complex is huge and one area contained the Temple of the Sun that was dedicated to the three biggest Gods in the Inca Pantheon – the Creator God Viracocha, the Moon Goddess Quilla and the Sun God Inti. Once upon a time, the place was filled with a lot of gold everywhere, but after taking Cusco, the Spaniards looted almost all the wealth, melted it all down and took it to Spain. They destroyed the place, and in 1534 built the Christian Monastery of Santo Domingo over the complex to signify the replacement of one religion with another. Little remains today except for the original foundation walls and lots of legendary stories. Those massive foundation walls that the Inca constructed were built from very large stones finely cut and fitted together without any mortar – a big feat of architecture. Another feature of the Inca builders was that the walls lean inwards, and were built to withstand earthquakes and sinking. The Spanish could not destroy these walls, so they just built over those solid foundations. The Incas were also known for their detailed astronomical observations. A few rooms are dedicated to this. Their knowledge of The Milky Way and other Constellations was incredible. Lots of proof of this is presented in some of those rooms. The Gardens of the complex are also beautiful, and were meant to pay homage to Inti. They are still immaculately maintained. One area has the three symbols of the Inca – The Puma, the Condor and the Snake – carved out in the grass. We had an amazing guided tour, and learned a tremendous amount about the Inca life, and their advance knowledge about architecture and astronomy. Recommend taking a guided tour to understand what you are looking at. A “Must Visit”.
    Visited September 2023
    Travelled with family
    Written 21 September 2023
  • lisajlb
    Westhoughton, United Kingdom1,476 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    Glad I had a guide
    This was part of a half.day tour of Cusco. I wish we had longer, but the guide we had explained about the discovery of the what are now the gardens following an earthquake in 1986. It was great to see the original INKA walls and were told that in future years they may be covered with glass to protect. The architecture and math used to build this without the technology we have.is impressive. Well worth a visit
    Visited October 2023
    Travelled solo
    Written 26 October 2023
  • E Curb N
    Monkey Mia, Australia109 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    La Conquista’s fractured legacy
    The pre-Columbian Qorikancha site was conveniently just around the corner from my Cusco accommodation at the Unaytambo. What remains of the Incas’ “Temple of the Sun” however are only fragments and ruins of the original structure, thanks to the Spanish conquerors who built their Santo Domingo Cathedral on top of it! The guide pointed out the most interesting feature of the original temple’s surviving stonework, the Inca architects had built the doorways and windows in such a way to create a perfect trapezoid form.
    Visited July 2023
    Travelled solo
    Written 18 November 2023
  • sttly
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida139 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Very interesting
    This was a very interesting site. The Spanish buildings were built on a native buildings which are now exposed and there is information about how they were built. Of all the sites we saw this was the only one that explained/showed this. Admission is 15 soles, less than $4 when we were there and is well worth that.
    Visited February 2024
    Travelled with friends
    Written 15 March 2024
  • Musicians Mum
    1,045 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    No guide needed.
    Tour Leader took us here whilst on a walking tour. Clean toilets. 15 sol entrance. Large ,spacious edifice, some parts of the ancient Inca substantial stone walls, other parts newer Catholic (but still ancient!!) construction
    Visited April 2024
    Travelled with friends
    Written 2 May 2024
  • Em
    Berlin, Germany105 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    Interesting place with a heavy historic significance, though not very informative without a guided tour
    While the promise of a newly discovered Inka temple underneath a colonial chaple is enticing, there is very little that could actually be seen today of the former temple, outside of some bare internal and remanants of the external wall. A scaled model of the supposed former temple tries to fill in the gap somewhat, and with some prior knowledge you could recognize and be impressed by the craft of the ancient masons and engineers. Unfortunately, there is very little being offered in means of information available around the site, so I would recommend considering taking a guide, as they seem to be full of knowledge and stories that could give your visit a whole different value. The second floor leads to the chappel area, with an admittedly much better designed exhibition. Going up to the bell tower is possible, though will cost you an extra 5 S/, which I found very reasonable. The high perch offers a lovely view of the rooftops, and a direct view of the bells.
    Visited May 2024
    Travelled solo
    Written 4 May 2024
  • Zan
    Los Angeles, California142 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    Former Inca Temple with a Spanish Cathedral Built On Top
    This is a great way to see the fusion, in this case forced fusion, of Inca and Spanish culture. The original building dates back to the 15th century and was a temple for the Inca people. Cusco was the capital of the Empire and this was their most important temple in the city. After the Spanish arrived, they built a church on top of it and all sorts of Christian iconography. It was the Spanish’s hope to stamp out the old Inca religion and supplant it with Catholicism. I am giving four stars because there is not a lot to see here and it is easy to cover all grounds in about 30 minutes, an hour tops. There are a lot of guides out front offering their services, but I didn’t feel that it was necessary and you can pretty much just use the map and read the signs to know what everything is. Given that the Inca did not have a written language a lot of it is speculation, in terms of the old part of the temple, but the new addition by the Spanish is well documented. It’s located right in the middle of the city and I would definitely recommend to anyone visiting Cusco.
    Visited April 2024
    Travelled as a couple
    Written 7 May 2024
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4.5
4.5 of 5 bubbles7,523 reviews
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IlyaNJ
Marlboro, NJ993 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2024 • Solo
An interesting instance of a monastery built into/on top of the important Inka temple complex. Going with a guide may help gain a better appreciation of different aspects of the remains of Inka structures.
Written 14 May 2024
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Zan
Los Angeles, CA142 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2024 • Couples
This is a great way to see the fusion, in this case forced fusion, of Inca and Spanish culture. The original building dates back to the 15th century and was a temple for the Inca people. Cusco was the capital of the Empire and this was their most important temple in the city. After the Spanish arrived, they built a church on top of it and all sorts of Christian iconography. It was the Spanish’s hope to stamp out the old Inca religion and supplant it with Catholicism.

I am giving four stars because there is not a lot to see here and it is easy to cover all grounds in about 30 minutes, an hour tops. There are a lot of guides out front offering their services, but I didn’t feel that it was necessary and you can pretty much just use the map and read the signs to know what everything is. Given that the Inca did not have a written language a lot of it is speculation, in terms of the old part of the temple, but the new addition by the Spanish is well documented. It’s located right in the middle of the city and I would definitely recommend to anyone visiting Cusco.
Written 7 May 2024
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Em
Berlin, Germany105 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2024 • Solo
While the promise of a newly discovered Inka temple underneath a colonial chaple is enticing, there is very little that could actually be seen today of the former temple, outside of some bare internal and remanants of the external wall. A scaled model of the supposed former temple tries to fill in the gap somewhat, and with some prior knowledge you could recognize and be impressed by the craft of the ancient masons and engineers.

Unfortunately, there is very little being offered in means of information available around the site, so I would recommend considering taking a guide, as they seem to be full of knowledge and stories that could give your visit a whole different value.

The second floor leads to the chappel area, with an admittedly much better designed exhibition.
Going up to the bell tower is possible, though will cost you an extra 5 S/, which I found very reasonable. The high perch offers a lovely view of the rooftops, and a direct view of the bells.
Written 4 May 2024
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Musicians Mum
1,045 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2024 • Friends
Tour Leader took us here whilst on a walking tour.
Clean toilets.
15 sol entrance.
Large ,spacious edifice, some parts of the ancient Inca substantial stone walls, other parts newer Catholic (but still ancient!!) construction
Written 2 May 2024
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

sttly
Fort Lauderdale, FL139 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2024 • Friends
This was a very interesting site. The Spanish buildings were built on a native buildings which are now exposed and there is information about how they were built. Of all the sites we saw this was the only one that explained/showed this. Admission is 15 soles, less than $4 when we were there and is well worth that.
Written 16 March 2024
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Christian M
Copenhagen, Denmark5,171 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2024 • Couples
The "Temple of the Sun" museum has clever marketers who have named it so. You might get excited, thinking you're about to experience the ancient Inca culture in full swing, almost like a counterpart to Machu Picchu, especially if you're a fan of Tintin's thrilling story with the same name.

The reality is a bit less thrilling. Yes, there used to be an old Inca temple here. Yes, some square gray-brown stones from that time are preserved. And yes, there are a few other artifacts from Inca culture.

But the remaining 90% of the museum, the church, and the accompanying garden are all about the Catholic Spaniards, portrayed as devout individuals - not the greedy, bloodthirsty criminals they were. As they say, winners truly write history.

There's an amusing, Madame Tussaud-like church installation on the first floor with clergy in full figure surrounded by more contemporary interpretations of the Bible. In my opinion, this is the museum's biggest highlight in the so-called Temple of the Sun.
Written 2 February 2024
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

advcards
Reno, NV4,150 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Jan 2024 • Friends
Walk around and see quite a few original Inca architecture. They have an example set up to show you the various types of stones they used and how they actually got them together.
Written 29 January 2024
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Maud G
4 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2023 • Friends
If it is about knowing the Inca culture, you should go to this place, I really liked it because you learn about the origin of the empire and how Cusco was before and after the conquest
Written 20 December 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Claudia H
7 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Nov 2023 • Couples
This beautiful temple was the center of Cusco made from indigenous rocks has survived 3 different mayor earthquakes and the Santo Doming church was built on the foundations still preserving part fo its indigenous beauty.
Written 11 December 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

E Curb N
Monkey Mia, Australia109 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
July 2023 • Solo
The pre-Columbian Qorikancha site was conveniently just around the corner from my Cusco accommodation at the Unaytambo. What remains of the Incas’ “Temple of the Sun” however are only fragments and ruins of the original structure, thanks to the Spanish conquerors who built their Santo Domingo Cathedral on top of it! The guide pointed out the most interesting feature of the original temple’s surviving stonework, the Inca architects had built the doorways and windows in such a way to create a perfect trapezoid form.
Written 18 November 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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Qorikancha, Cusco

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