El Amir Taz Palace
El Amir Taz Palace
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4.0 of 5 bubbles11 reviews
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Catherine S
Bolton, UK11,017 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2022 • Couples
From Salah el Din square we set off along Mohamed Karim street and found Taz Palace to our left on the corner of Al Soufeya street. Surprised to find that entrance is free, although we had to leave ID cards at the entrance!

It’s a huge Mamluk palace built in 1352AD with an intriguing history, now used as an exhibition centre and houses the Antiquities offices. Apart from the odd cleaning ladies the place was deserted. An sprawling area with a series of stairways leading to different areas and onto the roof. From the roof are views of the area, you can see the minarets of Sultan Hassan and Al Rafaai, the Citadel, minaret of Ibn Tulun, and in the distance the iconic Nile Ritz Carlton hotel on Tahrir Square.
Descending we found the balcony with its wonky chandeliers overlooking the central courtyard with its towering palm trees. There’s a hamman area with natural light shining through coloured glass. One can only imagine the splendour of the palace in its heyday. Many rooms are closed and locked but this does not detract from the immense size of the palace.
We even found clean and functioning toilets tucked away in a quiet corner!
Written 21 October 2022
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Osama Tarek
Cairo, Egypt67 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Sept 2019 • Solo
The palace is beautiful with many exhibitions held on it, but it suffered alot from neglecting through the ages, due to 1992 Egypt great earthquake, most of the buildings there is damaged, the great news that the restoration processes are happening since this date till now, about 60% of restorations are finished, the history of the palace is so interesting to pay a visit
Written 18 September 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Marwa Z
Alexandria, Egypt40 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2017 • Solo
at al Saufeya street , walking distance from Ibn Tulun Mosque.
It is a real Hidden gem, although it is Relatively small and not furnished
but it is quite Relaxing
Written 12 April 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Del_Blackwater
Madison, WI79 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Nov 2017 • Solo
A very overlooked palace in medieval Cairo, not far from the Citadel. You will most certainly have the place to yourself and it is absolutely incredable. It is (like all great Cairene mansions) an absolute maze and you will never be able to explore all of it. Really fun to try though
Written 30 November 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Sevket K
1 contribution
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Jan 2017 • Solo
This Memluk palace is located at the beginning of AL Saufeya street that takes you to Bab Zuweile. It is a path should be walked to involve Medieval Cairo and authentic Cairo lifestyle.
Written 16 January 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

avalon2020
Paris, France3,620 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Nov 2016 • Friends
This isn't on the usual tourist trail, but if you want to get off the beaten path, this is a beautiful example of a Mamluk palace. As of November 2016, there was a Mamluk exhibit and an exhibit of paintings ongoing.

No fee to enter. Restrooms available on site.
Written 12 November 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

afathi
Bucharest, Romania15 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Aug 2014 • Business
I've been to that place, you can organise some events in this palace not to mention that some cultural events already take place in the palace.
Written 18 July 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

MoustafaMegahed
Cairo, Egypt183 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
June 2015 • Couples
CDF.gov.eg organise regular events in Prince Taz palace specially in Ramadan. Most events are concerts, performances or traditional products bazar. The palace reflects the typical Islamic mamluk architecture. In addition, the neighborhood has several monuments from the same era.
Written 27 June 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

BobPraz
Toronto, Canada238 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2012 • Solo
This site is entirely free and open to the public: there is no fee or expected baksheesh. The guards at the entrance may ask to check your bags, but that's about it.

The site would originally have been a large complex of buildings built around 1352 for a Mamluk amir (a high government official at the time) and his household. Very few buildings of this type still exist; the only others I can think of are the Bashtak palace on al-Muizz street (north of Khan el-Khalili), which you can also visit, and the Qawsun palace which is actually very close to here but is largely ruined. The remains of this particular palace have been restored following an earthquake and are now used as a cultural venue.

Beyond historical interest, the building itself may be only of mild interest to the average tourist; it's on a much bigger scale than the Bayt el-Suhaymi or other old historical mansions you can visit, but it's out of the way and there's not really as much to see.

Still, of the two courtyards, one has a large loggia with a fairly nice painted ceiling, plus other decorated stone portals. Further inside, there's a well-preserved private hammam and toilets, and a few other rooms with painted wood ceilings and one large hall with faded fragments of decoration.

There is also an exhibit (information panels) on both the palace itself and on the Mamluks (the rulers of Egypt from 1250 to 1517 who are responsible for much of the architecture in medieval Cairo).

There are also decent bathrooms on-site.
Written 8 April 2013
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.
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El Amir Taz Palace - All You MUST Know Before You Go (2024)

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