Petersen Boarding House
Petersen Boarding House
4.5
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  • Metro Center • 4 min walk
  • Federal Triangle • 5 min walk
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See what travellers are saying
  • Josh G
    Portland, Indiana984 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Definitely do when you do the Ford's Theatre
    Just an amazing stop! They had the room lincoln died in, as well as a lot of things that were included in his death. They also had a really cool spot to as what would happen if Lincoln had lived... It was a really cool stop! I am glad we did it...
    Visited July 2023
    Travelled with family
    Written 29 July 2023
  • Kevin B
    Mount Juliet, Tennessee3,751 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    A must-see place of American history
    This is a must-see if you're visiting Ford's Theater as it completes the story of what happened on the night that President Lincoln was assassinated. Lincoln was brought here after he was shot and he died in this home. You can tour the house, which is only a few rooms, and see the room and bed where Lincoln died. There is also a museum attached to it that goes into detail about the hunt for Booth and the aftermath of the assassination, which was fascinating to read. This is an essential place to visit for American history enthusiasts and I would highly recommend coming here.
    Visited May 2023
    Travelled with friends
    Written 12 January 2024
  • Kelli
    Keller, Texas1,356 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    Small exhibit, but more coming!
    We toured here because Ford’s Theatre was closed for a private event. It’s a quick little tour through the bedroom where Lincoln died after being shot across the street. They are starting to expand into the building next store to create a more updated museum space, so keep an eye out for that to open in the future.
    Visited June 2024
    Travelled with family
    Written 24 June 2024
These reviews are the subjective opinion of Tripadvisor members and not of TripAdvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

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4.5
4.5 of 5 bubbles197 reviews
Excellent
113
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2babesandabrew
Pensacola, FL256 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
June 2023 • Couples
We were greeted at the door by a heavy set gentleman who sat at the door and bellowed out his B- speech. Also someone needs to DUST AND clean. The new addition was very nice and we enjoyed it.
Written 20 June 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Jaskel08
California336 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
June 2024 • Family
It was cool. We did it after attending the Ford Theatre production/tour. There really isn’t much to the Petersen House….. unless to go to the museum. However, the museum was closed for renovations. The Petersen House does go into what happen to Lincoln after he was shot and where he died. We ended up spending no more than 20 minutes there. 3 stars due to the museum being closed…… however, it was still worth it to go see.
Written 1 July 2024
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

MstqMI
Manistique1,292 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2023
A tour of the Peterson House is included in tickets to tour Ford's Theater. From the theater, just go across the street to Peterson House. The house was very interesting, especially to see the bed that President Lincoln died in. My husband & I love history so visiting both of these places was a must.
Written 19 May 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Josh G
Portland, IN984 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
July 2023 • Family
Just an amazing stop! They had the room lincoln died in, as well as a lot of things that were included in his death. They also had a really cool spot to as what would happen if Lincoln had lived... It was a really cool stop! I am glad we did it...
Written 29 July 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Maurene_K
Dover, NH12,152 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Sept 2014 • Friends
Most people remember from American History class that President was shot at Ford’s Theatre on April 14, 1865 by actor John Wilkes Booth. Few remember that Lincoln died at Petersen House, the boarding house across the street, on April 15, 1865 after doctors operated to save him in a back bedroom.

Admission for the tour of Petersen House is free, but one must get a timed-entry ticket at the Ford’s Theatre box office. It also provides admission to Ford’s Theatre which one tours first.

This attraction has three rooms on the tour:
1) The front living room is where Mary Lincoln spent most of the night awaiting word on her husband’s condition and being comforted by her son Robert Todd Lincoln.
2) The bed in the back bedroom was not big enough for Lincoln. They had lay him at an angle across the bed. After removing a blood clot to relieve pressure, all doctors could do was to make him comfortable. He died at 7:22 AM the next morning surrounded by his doctors, cabinet members, and his son Robert.
3) The third room is the back parlor where Secretary of War Edwin Stanton began his investigation into the assassination and ordered Booth’s arrest. The room contained a desk, bed, and small table with two chairs.

The tour was very informative. It contained details not found in the average history book.

I recommend a visit to this attraction and the related Ford’s Theatre as one of a DC visitor’s Top 10 Priorities.

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Written 26 September 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Morgan Arthur
South Charleston, WV59 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
July 2019 • Couples
Very interesting place to visit. Right across from Fords. Gotta have ticket from Fords in order to view the house.
Written 14 July 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

DeanMurphy2020
Orlando, FL7,689 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2014 • Solo
This attraction seems to be misnamed, though it was called Petersen’s Boarding House on April 14, 1865 when President Lincoln attended a play at Ford’s Theatre across the street—and where John Wilkes Booth fired a fatal shot into the President’s head. A boarding house, for younger folks who don’t know the concept, is a large house where people rented rooms, and shared a common bath and “parlor,” not unlike a B&B but on a long-term basis. The President was brought here for medical attention. But this is “the house where Lincoln died” a few hours later, on April 15. Across from and part of Ford’s Theatre, this attraction is maintained by National Park Service, thus Park Rangers are guides. Too, the accompanying photo depicts a Park Ranger standing behind a sign that has HOUSE WHERE LINCOLN DIED, not Petersen’s. Perhaps that’s why this is ranked 59 of 253 DC attractions—no one is sure of the name! This should be one of the top ten DC attractions, if TripAdvisor used the name National Park Service does.

A rose by any other name… Whatever you call it, this magnificently maintained museum retains everything in the room President Lincoln spent his final hours, and the chairs in which his family and cabinet members sat. The small bed for a great man seems woefully inadequate, and in fact Lincoln was laid diagonally on the bed, because of his height. The room is approximately 11x16 feet, and the entire house is filled with memorabilia and more facts than can be retained. On the 4th floor the hallway has a replica of prints made by humans, horses, and wagons, as though this were the dirt street used to bring Lincoln from Ford’s Theatre. Throughout the museum visitors read little known facts. It’s known that John Wilkes Booth shot Lincoln, jumped from the balcony at Ford’s, and broke his leg. Dr. Samuel Mudd mended Booth’s leg, and in an investigation lied that he did not know Booth personally or that he had shot the President. Mudd was convicted of conspiracy and not informing authorities that he treated someone who broke his leg at the time the assassin was known to have done so, thus the expression “His name is Mudd” came to represent anyone who associates with scoundrels. (Booth was captured 12 days later.)

As a writer, I found the circular tower of books surrounded by a spiral staircase most impressive. This “Book Tower” contains more than 20,000 books written about President Lincoln. Make that titles of books, as there’s only one of each. This impressive collection--representing more than a BILLION words--is a true memorial to a great man and wise president. There are far too many details to recite in this limited space. That is why I recommend Petersen’s/House Where Lincoln Died to be a must-see attraction.
Written 27 September 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

mlorahga
Augusta, GA1,507 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Nov 2019
This is the boarding house where Lincoln was taken after being shot. He subsequently died here. It is now a museum to the events of the day and the aftermath. Incredibly powerful!!!
Written 20 September 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Prawet J
Washington DC, DC12,795 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Sept 2019
The Petersen Boarding House is located across the street from the Ford's Theatre, and this is the place where President Lincoln spent the last few hours. It is part of the Ford's Theater Museum. Visitors will see the historic house and room and other detail information of the assessination and the manhunt. A very solem and moving place to learn about this piece of history. Next door building (connected to the house) is the Educational and Leadership Center. Worth an explor to learn how influential President Lincoln to Americans and others around the world. It is free but the ticket must be obtian at the Ford's Theater box office (the same ticket to the Ford's Theater Museum.
Written 27 September 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

SabreSailor
New York407 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2019 • Couples
We thought that the Peterson House would be a small follow-on to Ford's Theatre.

No way! While the first portion, showing the room where Lincoln died and the forward rooms where many sat and waited (all the original furniture is gone), is seen quickly and honestly unimpressively, you then take an elevator to the fourth floor of the adjacent building where you end up seeing four floors of fascinating material. I'll be we spent over an hour on these four floors!
Written 11 April 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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Petersen Boarding House - All You MUST Know Before You Go (2024)

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