Nový židovský Hřbitov
Nový židovský Hřbitov
4.5
About
The final resting place for 40,000 people, including famous author Franz Kafka, as well as a number of prominent rabbis and scholars.
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The area
Address
Neighbourhood: Žižkov
How to get there
  • Želivského • 2 min walk
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4.5
4.5 of 5 bubbles56 reviews
Excellent
30
Very good
17
Average
7
Poor
0
Terrible
2

fatbear2000
Oxford, UK4,114 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
June 2012 • Couples
The cemetery is a little way out from the centre of Prague, next to the Dorint Don Giovani Hotel by Zelivskeho metro station. Entrance is free but the cemetery is closed on Saturdays and Jewish Holidays. Also, as noted by other posters, male visitors are required to cover their heads. A baseball cap is fine

If the weather is good then the walk around the cemetery can be very peaceful, a bench is never too far away to sit and reflect upon, and there is plenty of shade from the tall trees throughout.

The grave of Kafka is the most famous feature, it is readily sign posted and it is easily the most well kept grave. There are also memorials to tragic events eg Terezin, Auschwitz etc.The majority of the graves though are overgrown with weeds, probably an indication of there being no families left to tend to them. The pathways and grass verges are well maintained though.

On striking observation is the sheer scale of the graves in the period 1940-45 and also the number of tombstones written in Hebrew and German rather than in Czech
Written 20 June 2012
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

René Ask
23 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Back to this site after 11 years - now with 3 little kids - was just right.
Kafka and not least all the memorials of Holocaust victims makes this a "must see" if you are visiting Prague. Take the metro direct to the gates of the site
Written 26 July 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Lulu
Brooklyn, NY286 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
June 2011 • Friends
Beautiful cemetery. Be sure to find Kafka and say hello. You'll find fans of his work leave him tokens of appreciation. The staff who work here are very nice and lovely people as well. This a must see spot to absorb the history of those who suffered under the Nazi regime. It's a pretty powerful place.
Written 15 May 2012
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Joseph C
Washington DC, DC54 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Dec 2010 • Solo
The New Jewish Cemetery is located well outside the tourist heart of Prague, and it's safe to say that tourists come here for exactly one reason: to visit the grave of Franz Kafka, the brilliant chronicler of twentieth-century alienation. There is no charge to enter the cemetery, though note that respectful attire is required, and men (including gentiles) are required to cover their heads; if you don't bring a hat or ballcap of your own, you can borrow one inside the office if they're open.

To find Kafka's grave, enter from the main road then immediately turn right, following the outside fence; after a couple hundred meters, you'll see it on your left. It's hard to miss because of its unusual shape, a black hexagonal crystal that's slightly wider at its top than at its base. You might be surprised to see the author identified as Dr. Franz Kafka, in honor of his doctor of laws degree; you might also be surprised, and disappointed, that the inscription is in Hebrew. The Hebrew text calls him Anchel Kafka, which is his Jewish name. Across from Kafka's grave is a plaque honoring his best friend, Max Brod, who did the world a tremendous service when he published Kafka's works posthumously and disregarded Kafka's instructions to have the manuscripts destroyed.

Just outside the entrance to the cemetery is a flower stand, so if you choose, you can buy flowers to lay on his grave. However, the Jewish tradition is to place a small stone on the grave as a sign of respect. I paid my respects by doing both, then contemplating his gravestone during the quiet, snowy day while thinking about what his works mean to me.

It's a tragic historical quirk that Kafka's writings were unknown in his native Prague until the 1990s; he published nothing of note during his life, his works were suppressed under Nazism because he was Jewish, and his works were suppressed under Communism because he championed the individual against the forces of bureaucracy and authoritarianism. As a result, most locations associated with Kafka were never preserved, so his grave is one of the few exceptions. If you're not a Kafka fan, there's no reason at all for you to visit; but if you're one of his many admirers, then this will be a peaceful, meaningful place to reflect on his works and pay homage to his prescient genius.

The nearest metro station is Želivského (on the A-Line), which is a few minutes' easy walk from the entrance to the cemetery. Alternatively, the cemetery is about 20 minutes' walk east (uphill) from the Flora shopping center. It is definitely NOT in reasonable walking distance of the historic center of Prague. There are no public bathrooms at the cemetery. The cemetery, including the path to Kafka's grave, is wheelchair-accessible.
Written 28 November 2011
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Roberto C
Pergine Valsugana, Italy42 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
June 2013 • Solo
It was a nice sunday afternoon when I decided to walk to the New Jewish Cemetery from Jiro Podebrad metro (green line). For a tourist there is just one reason to go there: Kafka's grave. The walk was nice, passing Flora (with big shopping mall), then you can enter the Catholic Cemetery, keeping yourself parallel to the main road, until you have to get out of it and you reach the New Jewish Cemetery which is in front of a bus stop and another metro station (zelivskeho metro).
As other reviews will indicate, to find the grave is pretty easy: follow the signs, the other tourists or your instinct, pay homage to a great artist and enjoy the silence.
Written 7 August 2013
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

valivinturis
Bucharest, Bucuresti, Romania51 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
July 2013 • Couples
This is a very peaceful place, with a park/wood feel due to the tall trees and vegetation around. It is very large, and taking a walk between all of the beautiful grave stones is very calming, especially since the cemetery is pretty empty, there were only 2 other people when we visited. It is also the resting place of Kafka.
Written 25 July 2013
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

DublinWelcomesAll
Dublin, Ireland2,772 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2018 • Solo
Men Don’t forget to wear a head cover when visiting. The graves are very close together and one can see that black marble is very much in fashion for 20thC Jewish headstones.
Written 11 April 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

randy s
Wilton Manors, FL2,209 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Aug 2016
Part of the Olsanske Cemetery complex across the street from the Radio Free Europe Office. This is out of the way place that gets you out of center city and is accessible by metro or a tram. Beautiful tranquil place. Amazing tombstones and greenery. Well worth a visit plus an escape from the crowds of Old Town. Kafka's graveside is well marked at sign number 21.
Written 10 August 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

ChoosyDublin
Athboy, Ireland69 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2015 • Couples
I liked this as it is a very calm and respectful graveyard with the most ornate headstones I've ever seen, and some beautifully mature trees, shrubs and plants. I didn't actually dislike anything about it. It was quite shocking how many of the plaques were dedicated to Jews who had perished in Terezin - another place you should visit while in Prague.
Written 10 August 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

PadiP
Poole, UK1,788 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
June 2014 • Couples
Spot where Franz Kafka is buried with his family and then you see all the memorials to those taken out at the death camps. Then it hits you what went on, even more so than in the Jewish quarter. Worth the trot up the hill out of town and it takes you through some of the more residential bits of the city. You are rarely away from a bar of coffee place!
Written 3 June 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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Nový židovský Hřbitov, Prague

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