Tea Gardens & Hawks Nest War Memorial

Tea Gardens & Hawks Nest War Memorial

Tea Gardens & Hawks Nest War Memorial
5
12:00 AM - 11:59 PM
Monday
12:00 AM - 11:59 PM
Tuesday
12:00 AM - 11:59 PM
Wednesday
12:00 AM - 11:59 PM
Thursday
12:00 AM - 11:59 PM
Friday
12:00 AM - 11:59 PM
Saturday
12:00 AM - 11:59 PM
Sunday
12:00 AM - 11:59 PM
What people are saying
Mairwen1
By Mairwen1
A Memorial, A Howitzer Gun & A Gallipoli Lone Pine
5.0 of 5 bubblesFeb 2022
This substantial war memorial sits beside the Myall River in Tea Gardens and is comprised of 3 main parts: i) a circular structure and flagpole ii) an original M2A2 Howitzer Gun iii) Lone Pine Three plain, concrete walls form the memorial's main circular structure and represent each of the 3 branches of service, the Army, Navy and Airforce. The words 'Lest We Forget' are inlaid in brass and a flagpole stands in the centre. This is a practical memorial and is the focus of Anzac Day services each year. It is broadly dedicated to to include those who sacrificed their lives during war as well as all men and women who have served overseas - a much more inclusive wording than in older, traditional memorials. Specific veterans are remembered with plaques affixed to timber park benches surrounding the memorial. Each plaque is inscribed with the full service details of the veteran, including name, service number, conflict, service unit birthdate and date of death. The Howitzer gun is the most eye-catching feature of the memorial. An original weapon, it was installed here in 2015 and is a tangible reminder of the reality of wartime violence, bloodshed and death. First used by the Australian Army during the Vietnam War, these Howitzers were critical in providing close artillery fire support for the army. The Lone Pine tree is a highly symbolic and poignant addition to the site. Planted on Anzac Day, 2003, it was grown from a seed from the original 'Lone Pine' at Gallipoli. The Battle of Lone Pine, a major offensive of WWI, was ultimately devastating for Australia. On one single day on August 6th, 1915, the Australian troops suffered 3500 casualties and won 7 Victoria Crosses. The story of how that seed came to be here is very moving. Following the battle, a soldier, Lance Corporal Smith, collected several pine cones from the trenches and sent them home to his mother. His brother had been one of the 2000 who died over the course of the battle. His mother would never be able go to Turkey where her son died but the pine cones were a small token from there that she could physically hold onto and feel connected to him. She grew two trees from the pine cone seeds, one of which she gave to the Australian War Memorial, and in memory of all those who fell, they propagated many more trees, including this one.

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Mairwen1
United Kingdom9,654 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2022
This substantial war memorial sits beside the Myall River in Tea Gardens and is comprised of 3 main parts:
i) a circular structure and flagpole
ii) an original M2A2 Howitzer Gun
iii) Lone Pine
Three plain, concrete walls form the memorial's main circular structure and represent each of the 3 branches of service, the Army, Navy and Airforce. The words 'Lest We Forget' are inlaid in brass and a flagpole stands in the centre. This is a practical memorial and is the focus of Anzac Day services each year.
It is broadly dedicated to to include those who sacrificed their lives during war as well as all men and women who have served overseas - a much more inclusive wording than in older, traditional memorials.
Specific veterans are remembered with plaques affixed to timber park benches surrounding the memorial. Each plaque is inscribed with the full service details of the veteran, including name, service number, conflict, service unit birthdate and date of death.
The Howitzer gun is the most eye-catching feature of the memorial. An original weapon, it was installed here in 2015 and is a tangible reminder of the reality of wartime violence, bloodshed and death. First used by the Australian Army during the Vietnam War, these Howitzers were critical in providing close artillery fire support for the army.
The Lone Pine tree is a highly symbolic and poignant addition to the site. Planted on Anzac Day, 2003, it was grown from a seed from the original 'Lone Pine' at Gallipoli.
The Battle of Lone Pine, a major offensive of WWI, was ultimately devastating for Australia. On one single day on August 6th, 1915, the Australian troops suffered 3500 casualties and won 7 Victoria Crosses. The story of how that seed came to be here is very moving. Following the battle, a soldier, Lance Corporal Smith, collected several pine cones from the trenches and sent them home to his mother. His brother had been one of the 2000 who died over the course of the battle. His mother would never be able go to Turkey where her son died but the pine cones were a small token from there that she could physically hold onto and feel connected to him. She grew two trees from the pine cone seeds, one of which she gave to the Australian War Memorial, and in memory of all those who fell, they propagated many more trees, including this one.
Written 20 March 2022
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Tea Gardens & Hawks Nest War Memorial - All You Need to Know BEFORE You Go (2024)

Frequently Asked Questions about Tea Gardens & Hawks Nest War Memorial

Tea Gardens & Hawks Nest War Memorial is open:
  • Sun - Sat 12:00 am - 11:59 pm



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