Faubourg-d'Amiens Cemetery

Faubourg-d'Amiens Cemetery, Arras

Faubourg-d'Amiens Cemetery
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Faubourg-d'Amiens Cemetery is in the western part of the town of Arras in the Boulevard du General de Gaulle, near the Citadel, approximately 2 Kms due west of the railway station. The GPS coordinates for the cemetery are 50.28670, 2.76057
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5.0
182 reviews
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KiwiKerry53
Wellington, New Zealand4,401 contributions
Oct. 2019
A special WW1 memorial and very close to the main Arras main square. Beautiful cemetery and well kept graves of commonwealth soldiers and also some prisoners of war.
An incredibly moving monument to all those men - sons, fathers, grandfathers, brothers, uncles and friends who never returned home. It is easy to get lost in your thoughts here. Thank you and RIP to those lost.
Written 13 April 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Sondonduo
Derby, UK483 contributions
Oct. 2019 • Couples
Sad to say it it a very memorable visit. It certainly makes you think. Very well kept by the CWGC. Will go again
Written 5 November 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Caroline V.
12 contributions
Oct. 2019
Well worth visiting this WW1 memorial.. it is only about 10 minutes walk from main square. Apart from all the graves of the commonwealth soldiers who lost their lives there are also some German prisoner of war graves...
Written 29 October 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Graeme O
Swindon6 contributions
Aug. 2019
Ihave been to this site twice. It is very atmospheric and contains one of the first ever memorials to the RFC and RAF. Good place to have a service if you have a priest with you.
Written 9 October 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

AnnskyDoodle
Tamworth, UK48 contributions
Sep. 2019
Peaceful and reflective place. We spent a couple of hours looking at all the names listed. It was very quite when we visited
Written 6 October 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Aleph_999
Salamanca, Spain680 contributions
Oct. 2019
A very imposing place. Reminder of heroism and war. Of blood and tears. White and symmetric. Very moving visit and 24 hours opening
Written 3 October 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Lucyland13
Derbyshire, UK89 contributions
Aug. 2019
It feels rather strange to be reviewing a cemetery to be honest but if it helps anyone then its worth doing. As with all the cemeteries/memorials we have visited in France this is extremely well maintained. I wont go into detail about what you can find here because the information tells you all about it. The walls of names seem never ending, very emotional. As far as getting here, there is a car park across the road if you are travelling by car as we were. Free of charge. Definitely worth a visit if you are in the area and want to pay your respects to those at rest here and those whose bodies have not been found. The walls are large to accomodate all the names but the actual cemetary itself is not huge.
Written 9 August 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

JohnSchof
Blackburn, UK71 contributions
Jul. 2019 • Couples
1st World War memorial and cemetery, with British and Commonwealth graves (plus a few German as well). An interesting place to spend some time and pay respects to those who gave their lives. Short walk from town centre or free parking opposite.
Written 30 July 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

djrose007
Gloucester, UK222 contributions
Jun. 2019 • Solo
I visited France with the specific aim of visiting this CWGC cemetery to find my Great Uncle, John Pattison. His body was never found but I knew he was immortalised with a inscription on the wall.
More detail was in the catalogues, 8 of them in all plus informative folders to read.

Well worth the emotional visit.
Written 4 June 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

annonymus800
London, UK1,064 contributions
Aug. 2018 • Solo
Includes the Arras Flying Memorial.
The French handed over Arras to Commonwealth forces in the spring of 1916 and the system of tunnels upon which the town is built were used and developed in preparation for the major offensive planned for April 1917. The Commonwealth section of the FAUBOURG D'AMIENS CEMETERY was begun in March 1916, behind the French military cemetery established earlier. It continued to be used by field ambulances and fighting units until November 1918. The cemetery was enlarged after the Armistice when graves were brought in from the battlefields and from two smaller cemeteries in the vicinity. The cemetery contains over 2,650 Commonwealth burials of the First World War, 10 of which are unidentified. The graves in the French military cemetery were removed after the war to other burial grounds and the land they had occupied was used for the construction of the Arras Memorial and Arras Flying Services Memorial.
The adjacent ARRAS MEMORIAL commemorates almost 35,000 servicemen from the United Kingdom, South Africa and New Zealand who died in the Arras sector between the spring of 1916 and 7 August 1918, the eve of the Advance to Victory, and have no known grave. The most conspicuous events of this period were the Arras offensive of April-May 1917, and the German attack in the spring of 1918. Canadian and Australian servicemen killed in these operations are commemorated by memorials at Vimy and Villers-Bretonneux. A separate memorial remembers those killed in the Battle of Cambrai in 1917. The adjacent ARRAS FLYING SERVICES MEMORIAL commemorates more than 1,000 airmen of the Royal Naval Air Service, the Royal Flying Corps, and the Royal Air Force, either by attachment from other arms of the forces of the Commonwealth or by original enlistment, who were killed on the whole Western Front and who have no known grave.
During the Second World War, Arras was occupied by United Kingdom forces headquarters until the town was evacuated on 23 May 1940. Arras then remained in German hands until retaken by Commonwealth and Free French forces on 1 September 1944. The 1939-1945 War burials number 8 and comprise 3 soldiers and 4 airmen from the United Kingdom and 1 entirely unidentified casualty. Located between the 2 special memorials of the 1914-1918 War is the special memorial commemorating an officer of the United States Army Air Force, who died during the 1939-1945 War. This special memorial, is inscribed with the words "Believed to be buried in this cemetery". In addition, there are 30 war graves of other nationalities, most of them German. Both cemetery and memorials were designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens, with sculpture by Sir William Reid Dick.
Written 22 May 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

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