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Jewish Museum of Thessaloniki

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Address: Agiou Mina 13, Thessaloniki, Greece
Name/address in local language
Phone Number:
+30 231 025 0406
Website
Today
10:00 - 15:00
17:00 - 20:00
Open now
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Hours:
Sun 10:00 - 14:00
Mon - Fri 10:00 - 15:00
Wed - Thu 17:00 - 20:00
Description:

The Jewish Museum of Thessaloniki was founded to honor the rich and...

The Jewish Museum of Thessaloniki was founded to honor the rich and creative Sephardic heritage as it evolved in the city of Thessaloniki.On the ground level are monumental stones and inscriptions that were once found in the great Jewish necropolis that lay to the east of the city walls. Accompanying these stones are a series of photographs showing the cemetery and visitors as it was in 1914.Central to the first floor is a narrative history of the Jewish presence in Thessaloniki from the 3rd century BCE until the Second World War. A separate exhibit focuses on the Shoah, as it affected the Jewish Community of Thessaloniki. The majority of the community - some 49,000 persons - was systematically deported to Auschwitz and Bergen-Belsen where most of them perished.A research and documentation center operates within the premises, which aims to document and digitize archival documents from the Museum's own collection as well as archival material from other sources, thus creating a database accessible to visitors.The Museum provides special educational programs for schools.

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Comprehensive memorial to a lost citizenry...

Located on Agiou Mina, off El. Venizelou Ave. this impressive, classical museum, dedicated to the destroyed Jewish communities of Northern Greece, is a comprehensive record of the... read more

Reviewed yesterday
eilonglen
,
Ashkelon, Israel
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200 Reviews from our TripAdvisor Community

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Showing 138: English reviews
Ashkelon, Israel
Level Contributor
238 reviews
114 attraction reviews
common_n_attraction_reviews_1bd8 157 helpful votes
Reviewed yesterday NEW

Located on Agiou Mina, off El. Venizelou Ave. this impressive, classical museum, dedicated to the destroyed Jewish communities of Northern Greece, is a comprehensive record of the widespread and active segment of Greek Jewry, one of the first victims of the Nazi depredations throughout the Balkans and all of contiguous Europe. The horrific subject is treated with deference and respect... More 

Helpful?
Thank eilonglen
Jerusalem, Israel
Level Contributor
27 reviews
6 attraction reviews
common_n_attraction_reviews_1bd8 3 helpful votes
Reviewed 3 weeks ago

I found the museum thought provoking in view of the tragedy of the Jews of Saloniki, who were the majority of the people of the city at one point, and yet, 97% were killed in Auschwitz. I found the headstones of graves particularly interesting.

Helpful?
Thank rahelgershuni
Level Contributor
7 reviews
3 attraction reviews
common_n_attraction_reviews_1bd8 2 helpful votes
Reviewed 3 weeks ago

A place worth a visit for those interested in the history of jewish people and history of the town. A lot of unfortunate destanies and emotions in a small but nicely organized space. At the end I was trying to imagine how the town would look like today if it remained the diversity it had ad that time and concluded... More 

Helpful?
Thank Bojan S
Tel Aviv
Level Contributor
56 reviews
21 attraction reviews
common_n_attraction_reviews_1bd8 28 helpful votes
Reviewed 3 weeks ago via mobile

a little building , trying to tell a great sad tale... very moving and informative. a must in order to be aware to the tragedy happened to the jews during ww2, loaded on trains taking them to death camps. about 45,000 people, proud residents of thessaloniki were murdered.

Helpful?
Thank ViviTelAviv
Lisbon, Portugal
Level Contributor
86 reviews
47 attraction reviews
common_n_attraction_reviews_1bd8 36 helpful votes
Reviewed 5 weeks ago

One can categorize the visit to this museum the same manner one does the others. Above all it's the extreme will to survive which stands as the major issue and all the connections that the Jews of Salonica bring to all of us independently of our origins.

Helpful?
Thank 262sasha
Florida
Level Contributor
285 reviews
90 attraction reviews
common_n_attraction_reviews_1bd8 128 helpful votes
Reviewed 15 April 2017

This excellent museum traces the history of the Jews from the time they arrived in Thessaloniki from Spain until the present. The once vibrant Jewish life in Thessaloniki was totally wiped out by the Nazis in 1943 when tens of thousands of Jews were rounded up and sent to Auschwitz. Well laid out, very intereresting, moving and important.

Helpful?
1 Thank Shar1805
London, United Kingdom
Level Contributor
54 reviews
8 attraction reviews
common_n_attraction_reviews_1bd8 36 helpful votes
Reviewed 18 March 2017 via mobile

Excellent museum. Well laid out, informative, interesting and very moving - especially regarding the Holocaust and the situation after the war. The monument with all the names of the thousands who were murdered is simple and yet shocking as you can see whole families wiped out.

Helpful?
Thank Andrea L
Guernsey
Level Contributor
169 reviews
61 attraction reviews
common_n_attraction_reviews_1bd8 67 helpful votes
Reviewed 2 March 2017 via mobile

This museum situated on the first floor of a pretty building chronicles the history of Jews from the time they arrived from Spain until the present day. It was fascinating to learn of the large numbers of the community and their prominent place in the wealthy and influential society of Thessaloniki, especially during the 19th century. It relates the appalling... More 

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2 Thank Lawnturtle
Tel Aviv, Israel
Level Contributor
17 reviews
6 attraction reviews
common_n_attraction_reviews_1bd8 8 helpful votes
Reviewed 22 February 2017

A small building telling the story of Jewish Thessaloniki. Once up on a time, there was a big city in Greece with Jewish life and culture. A community totally destroyed by the Nazi occupation in World War 2. The ground floor is just few saved remains of grave stones from the destroyed ancient grave-yard. Stones that were re-used as pavements... More 

Helpful?
Thank YRL69
Athens, Greece
Level Contributor
11 reviews
4 attraction reviews
common_n_attraction_reviews_1bd8 4 helpful votes
Reviewed 17 February 2017 via mobile

Situated in the center of the old Salonica center, a remembrance of the history of the Jewish people that lived in Salonica through the ages! Among the published books, collections, etc, are tradicional songs of the sephardi Jews in lantino!

Helpful?
Thank Yapon10

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