Forum of Augustus
Forum of Augustus
4.5
Historic SitesAncient RuinsPoints of Interest & Landmarks
About
Built in celebration over Augustus' victory over the murder of Caesar in 42 BC, this ancient site is dominated by the remains of the Temple of Mars.
Duration: 1-2 hours
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The area
Address
Neighbourhood: Centro
How to get there
  • Fori Imperiali-Colosseo • 7 min walk
  • Colosseo • 7 min walk
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4.5
4.5 of 5 bubbles1,299 reviews
Excellent
863
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354
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75
Poor
3
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4

mark
Frankfurt, Germany8 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
June 2024 • Family
it was a wonderful experience for me and our children. it takes more than 1 hour to visit all the forum roman. I suggest to go early in the morning
Written 15 June 2024
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Herbert C
1,370 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Jan 2024 • Couples
Imagine a forum with a grand temple standing at the end of a long and spacious courtyard flanked on both sides by columned porticos filled with larger-than-life bronze statues. This architectural marvel is the Forum of Augustus during the heydays of the Roman Empire. Built by Augustus, the founder of the Roman Empire who reigned as the first Roman Emperor from 27 BC to AD 14, this beautiful forum was the venue for important political and religious functions after its inauguration in 2 BC. Sadly, it went into a steady decline following the collapse of the Roman Empire in the 5th century, and eventually became the ruins that we see today along Via dei Fori Imperiali. It's not difficult for visitors today to visualise how grand this forum must have been 2000 years ago. The ruins can be viewed for free from the elevated street level, providing visitors a sense of how much the street level of Rome has been raised in the past 20 centuries. The city has done an excellent job in preserving the ruins for posterity - a truly quintessential Rome sight!
Written 22 March 2024
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

andyh67186334
Coalville, UK9,691 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
July 2023 • Family
The Forum of Augustus can be observed for free from the street adjacent to the Roman Forum and also at elevation on surrounding viewing platforms.
You get a sense that great structures once stood there and would have joined up with the Forum on the opposite side of the road in ancient times.
Written 14 July 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Deanosaur89
Edmonton, Canada7,320 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2023 • Couples
The Forum of Augustus is nearby several other forums that are in a state of ruin. This forum was excavated in the 1900s and you can see the outlines of the former buildings on the bricks to the back of it. There are signs in the area to explain the history of the area that show drawings of the buildings that used to exist. It is likely that the stones from this forum were used to construct other items in the area. It is very close to the Colosseum and we spent about an hour looking at all the forum ruins and reading the signs in the area. You can buy a ticket to go down and walk through the ruins but it seems a tad expensive and you can see most of it from above.
Written 29 April 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Mairwen1
United Kingdom10,823 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
June 2022
This was the second of the imperial fora which was built by the Emperor, Augustus over a period of almost 40 years and was inaugurated in 2 BC. I found the forums confusing (and I don’t think I’m alone). There are several. Caesar had one. So did Nerva and Trajan and they are all clustered together. It can be hard to tell where one ends and one starts. To complicate matters, what’s left is mainly ruins. For the most part, what you see are chunks of columns, missing statues, patches of flagstones and discarded blocks of marble and stone.
Nevertheless it is worth a look mainly because it is very close to the Colosseum and can be easily seen from the public footpath. If you are walking along the Via dei Fori Imperiali (the street of the Imperial Forums) towards the Colosseum, you’ll pass right by Augustus’ Forum, on the left hand side.
There are a number of decent information panels in both Italian and English which help a lot and it’s worth stopping and taking the time to read them. They give a good insight into the grandeur of what originally stood here and helps you understand how it all functioned. Once the centre of city life in ancient Rome, ceremonies of state and public meetings were held here, the senate met to declare both war and peace and the law courts operated. The forum included an open plaza lined on its long sides by colonnades with niches. Rows of statues lined the niches but largest of all was a colossal 14m tall statue of Augustus, glorifying the emperor. In the middle of the square, Augustus was represented on a majestic triumphal chariot. Built with exotic marbles, the ancient historian, Pliny called the forum ‘one of the most beautiful buildings in the world’.
The best preserved structure in Augustus’ forum is the Temple of Mars Ultor, dedicated to the Roman god, Mars the Avenger which stood as tall as a 9-storey building. An elevated path leads through the middle of the forum and gives you close-up view. It also makes you realise just how far below today’s ground level, ancient Rome sat. I’d highly recommend taking a few extra minutes to follow this short path.
NOTE: A night-time sound and light show at the Fora of Augustus started on 10th June. We weren’t in Rome long enough to catch it but it looked like an interesting way to see the forum areas.
Written 10 June 2022
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

FTMDave
Adria, Italy7,211 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
June 2021
I went in June 2021. I'm not sure how things are in non-COVID times, but there was no way to actually enter the site. However, that was no problem as you can see the whole magnificent area perfectly from outside.
Written 26 June 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

dapper777
Monaco63,932 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2021 • Friends
The Forum of Augustus, in a chronological order, was the second to be built (after that one of Caesar).
What we see today are three columns of the temple dedicated by Emperor Octavian Augustus to the god Mars Ultor (central part of the bottom of the forum).
Augustus had promised to erect a temple after Brutus and Cassius, the assassins of Caesar who was his adoptive father, were defeated in the Battle of Philippi in 42 BC.
He made it entirely at his own expense and inaugurated it in 2 BC.
The Forum was needed, in a city that was expanding rapidly, to give more space to court cases and commercial activities.
The works lasted a long time (several decades) and ended in 2 BC.
The dimensions of the Forum were 125 meters long and 118 meters wide.
To clearly divide the Forum from the popular neighborhoods behind it (the Suburra and the slopes of the Quirinale) and create a barrier to fires, he enclosed it with a mighty wall of peperino blocks (at the bottom of the temple) which has remained until today.
At the head of the northern portico of the temple there was a distinct room which housed a colossal statue of the emperor.
Also noteworthy is the Arco dei Pantani, still visible today.
This arch, today in via Tor de' Conti, in the Rione Monti, is an arch with a single arch without any ornament that connected the Suburra to the Pantani area, an area so called because it is subject to flooding of the Tiber and malaria.
It was formed with large rectangular blocks, and, in the times it was created, it was of great importance, because it connected the Forums with the Suburra (which was a disreputable area of Rome, and which is now in the current Monti district).
Visiting this incredibly spectacular and interesting site is an experience not to be missed.
Written 2 June 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Jo_and_Tom
Anna, OH1,944 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Mar 2020
To see this area - you go under the street from Forumand see it as well as the Arch of Trajan. It is an active excavation site so what we saw was different than some of these photos.
Written 19 April 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Paul C
Leatherhead, UK90 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Mar 2020
Another fascinating place to see in Rome, one of many, sadly 4 days is just not enough to see it all.
Written 12 March 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Martino B
Chelmsford, UK5,197 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2020 • Family
You have to admire this superb architecture the red break makes it stand out from everything else around you loved it the views to the other side blow you away
Written 19 February 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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