Amphitheater

Amphitheater, Solin: Address, Amphitheater Reviews: 4/5

About
Amphitheatre forms part of the town defence system and it could have accommodated about 15,000 spectators. It is located at the northwest end of Salona's town limits. Close to the amphitheatre, to its south, there was a cemetery for gladiators that have been killed in the arena. From their epitaphs you could know their names, origins, homelands and fighting specialities.
Suggested duration
2-3 hours
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4.0
28 reviews
Excellent
9
Very good
6
Average
12
Poor
1
Terrible
0

tomballardnd
Seattle, WA59 contributions
Solin Amphitheater
Sep. 2018
This is part of the ancient site of Solin. Not as well preserved or restored as other theaters I've seen in Turkey and Greece but the location overlooking the sea was very nice and the entire Solin complex is well worth a 1/2 day trip from Split either by public bus (?#11?) or tour.
Written 7 November 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

KatyJo1
Nottingham28 contributions
Very very old!
Jun. 2018 • Family
We eventually found this (the road down to it looks very incongruous) and couldn't believe it just appears as if out of nowhere! There's an information board in English to tell you the importance of the building. It's obviously in ruins but it's easy to imagine the amphitheater in its prime. There was the option of paying 15 kuna to enter some extra parts but we didn't bother as we had a very hot 5 year old with us! She really enjoyed climbing around the ruins and hearing about gladiators.
Written 2 June 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

Michael P
Tagaytay, Philippines1,393 contributions
Shore Excursion Sight
Oct. 2016 • Couples
Ante Batarelo has led our shore excursion group of Prinsendam cruisers that was organized on Cruise Critic Rollcall to the Amphitheatre ruins of Salona. We are told it was built at the end of the 2nd Century. It once seated 17,000 spectators who came to enjoy the entertainment of the day. Ante pointed out the main entrance and the governor’s state box. This amphitheater had two lower levels for seating spectators and an upper level for those standing. The Venetians had the main structure devastated during their 17th century war with the Turks. Standing on the side of the hill taking all this in is a thrill for those that love history
Written 21 July 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

mjrg59
Iowa City, IA1,113 contributions
Relaxing stop off near Split airport
Apr. 2017 • Couples
After a long international flight, this site will put you in the mood for the Diocletian's palace in Split. The ruins of the amphitheater are not intact but this area anteceded Split in Roman building and settlement so it is a good stopping off point for your Split experience.
Written 17 April 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

Ana
Moscow, Russia371 contributions
One of Salona's most impressive archaeological finds. Very interesting. A must.
Nov. 2016 • Couples
This monumental building was built on the northwest end of city’s limits, in the second half of the 2nd century A.D. It must have been one of the most remarkable buildings of Roman architecture back then. The building was ellipsoidal in shape, with three floors (two with arcades and the third with rectangular windows) on the south side and one floor on the north side (conveniently laid down on a natural hillside). It is believed that it could have accommodated about 18,000 spectators. On the south side, there were seats of honor for the city's government authorities. The whole arena could be covered with canvas, giving protection from the sun and rain. The remains of Roman amphitheatre indicate that gladiator fights were held in the city of Salona just as in any part of Roman empire and, during Diocletian's Christian persecutions the amphitheatre was used as a site of executions. In one room of the southeastern part of the amphitheater was discovered a Christian oratory. It's relatively well preserved (considering its age). Basically, you can see only the lower parts of its large walls along with some fragments of architectural decoration and stone sculpture. Sadly, the amphitheatre was most severely damaged during the wars in the 17th century when Venetians had it demolished for strategic reasons. Today, this place and surroundings are great for enjoy a wonderful walk among history with nice sights. Definitely, worth it! Highly recommended!
Written 23 February 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

Clive W
Orpington1,668 contributions
Impressive - part of Salona - not in Solin
May 2016 • Couples
My wife and I visited here using the number 1 bus from Split. The journey took about 15-20 minutes. Don't take any of the other buses that go to Solin - it is not the same place. If you take a different bus then you will have a walk of 1-2km. We got off a bus stop or two early and walked up the hill to the site. Surprisingly the turning to it was not signposted from the road, so it was probably fortunate we did get off too early.

Entrance was 30-40 kuna and the ticket office is several tens of metres past one of the first ruins. The amphitheatre was the most impressive part of the ruins. Although impressive we did not find much to keep us interested for more than 60-70 minutes. There are some notices in English.

We left the complex near the amphitheatre and took a 37 bus on the nearby motorway to Troggir. The 37 bus is an option for getting to Salona - you'll need to ask the bus driver to tell you when to get off. Here, on the opposite side of the road, is also where you could get a 37 bus to return to Split. One interesting aspect about the amphitheatre is that there appears no ticket office at this end. We saw no sign of one, simply a local pointing us in the right direction to avoid us walking through his property!
Written 31 May 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

Klaus H
4 contributions
Like
Jul. 2015 • Friends
Nice amphitheater close to our hotel President. It would be even better if lightening were much better and signalisation as well.all in total we liked it but would prefere if we were able to have english guiding at the spot.
Written 1 February 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

Bradley T
indy5,789 contributions
Amphitheatre and Parac house
May 2015 • Couples
This is the most obvious of the Salona ruins. It's a big oval ruin with lots of the supports but none of the seats. Don't skip the Parac house on the edge. It has some cool sculptures found on the site.
Written 28 December 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

Kathy504
Hamilton, Canada128 contributions
Needs some improvements to make it a better attraction
Sep. 2015 • Couples
It is best not to visit these ruins on a blistering hot day. Having said that, a couple of things could possibly have saved it, even so.
When you first arrive to the site, you can walk through the Manastirine Necropolis and see the tomb of Father Frane Bulić, who was the archaeologist here. After that, you have to pay 30 Kuna to get inside the gates to see the other ruins located here. We asked if there was a map to guide us to the various sites, and were told that we would have to buy one for 3 Kuna. We should have bought one, but we didn't. So, we followed the road in and right away were in front of the Basilica urbana. It is quite vast, and very impressive, for sure. There is a big signboard with the layout pictured and a description, right by the ruins. There are some other signs dotted around the area as well.
Once you've wandered down around the area, you're left wondering where to go next. This is the big problem that I had. There are no signs pointing towards the Amphitheater, which is the big draw to these ruins, really. After seeing such great signage for each set of ruins, I can't believe that they can't invest in some signs that point and say "Amphitheater, 2km >", or whatever the actual distance is. I guess to me, in the hot sun, wandering aimlessly, it seemed like 2 kms. I did manage to find one sign, hidden in the trees of an olive grove that happened to be in the middle of everything.
So please, to whomever runs this attraction, include a complimentary map for your guests and get some more signs!
P.S. If you need money, you should consider selling cold bottles of water instead of maps!
Written 1 September 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

Silvia B
Province of Vicenza, Italy94 contributions
Amazing!
Aug. 2015 • Couples
I think that the archaeology park of Solin is really interesting: it's an amazing and suggestive place, and everything is well-explained!I study archaeology and I usually visit or dig roman ruins, in Solin I found a great place where I never ever seen some things, such as the burial cathedral. However I found it difficult to find. Free entry.
Written 25 August 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

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