Nagase house
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4.0
4.0 of 5 bubbles87 reviews
Excellent
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tomizuta1953
Funabashi, Japan1,342 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Sept 2023 • Couples
There are a couple of Gassho-style buildings that the owners allow visitors such as the Nagase Family residence. This is one of the largest buildings in the village with five storeys built in 1890. The heads of the Nagase Family served as doctors for the powerful Maeda Clan of Kaga (currently Ishikawa and Toyama Prefectures). According to the brochure you receive as you pay the admission fee, "the house was built in 1890 and has a large steep roof. A single piece of rafter beams, called gassho-zai, about 11-meter-long, runs the length of the roof from top to bottom of the slope. Natural cypress trees over 150 years old and trees over 300 years old are used for the pillars of the house." It is well worth the admission fee of 400 yen to explore their magnificent Buddhist altar to remember their ancestors built about 500 years ago, as well as to visit the silkworm breeding areas on the third and fourth floor.
Written 11 November 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Kent P
Batavia, OH101 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2021
I enjoyed this house very much. Lots of interesting items to see on the top floor. Open until 5pm for 300 yen.
Written 25 February 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Fion
10 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Dec 2019
This is the only one thatched houses that we have visited during our trip to Shirakawago and it is indeed an eye-opener to see how the house looks like internally for each and every of this 5-storey house. This house was built in 1890 and in 2001, the big roof was re-thatched for the first time in 80 years and more than 500 people were working on it. It is really an experience that I find it very unique.
Written 26 December 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

AnitaDmello
Melbourne, Australia15 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Sept 2019
Absolutely worth a visit - a glimpse into the years gone by
Breathtaking scenery and beautiful home
Everything from tools to cutlery to furniture have a story to tell
Written 7 October 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Brigette
Hong Kong, China402 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Aug 2019
Of Kanda, Wada and this house, we love this one the most as there was a genuine fireplace and also free ice tea for visitors. Also the Nagase family used to be doctors/ healers so there were lots of medical equipment from the past.
Written 22 August 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

The Weak Knee Traveler
Singapore, Singapore12,841 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Mar 2018 • Solo
If time permits, one should visit Wada, Kanda and this which are opened to public. This particular one is 5 storey high and entrance fee is ¥300/-. There is a nice view from the top floor.
Written 15 April 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

William S
Kobe, Japan1,426 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2017 • Couples
This is one of the better houses to visit, in my opinion. It is well-maintained and includes quite a few artifacts on several floors. You get a sense of life when these buildings were used a residences - and why no one lives in them now. The roofs are works of art and the craftsmanship and ingenuity are clear.
Written 23 October 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

moot
Tenbury Wells, UK1,311 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2017
It is a free site though you pay a small amount to enter this, the oldest house which I highly recommend- it is deceptively spacious inside and has four open plan floors! There is a display of all sorts of old farming/living equipment and good views out of the top floor windows.
Written 6 April 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Matt R
Culpeper, VA107 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2016 • Family
Relatively auththentic "Praying Hands" house. Cheap to enter, $4.50 us for adults and about $2 us for kids, prices change based on exchange rates, THEY ONLY TAKE YEN.

Make sure you go all the way to the top, check out the antique and vintage farm items.
Written 17 April 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Lambert
Taipei, Taiwan1,753 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Nov 2015
Then entrance took 300 JPY for adult and 200 for kid (under 13). I was amazed to see that there were actually 4 floors in the house. It was great to learn the wisdom of ancient people and see how they utilize the space effectively. If you come to the village and you have time, please do pay the house a visit.
Written 8 November 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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