Mornington Railway
Mornington Railway
4.5
Sunday
10:30 AM - 4:00 PM
What people are saying
Heritage rail line with an interesting history hidden away in the back blocks of Mornington Peninsula.
July 2021
Review of Mornington Railways Well, what did we expect? We’d caught a period in between lockdowns and the Peninsula was there to be explored. It was mid-week and we’d enjoyed half-a-day in Dromana before heading north with the Regional Gallery and the Mornington Railway in Mornington on our bucket list for that afternoon. Sure, the trains would not be running – it’s a difficult time for keeping to schedules with Covid-19 off-the-leash in NSW and over-the-border issues of exposure sites and more in Victoria. We had thought, however, to capture the images of the railway from the stations, perhaps along the line and, crucially, take in any marshalling yards that may be accessible. It didn’t quite work out as expected. The gallery was easy - there was a friendly custodian at the desk who invited us into what was a spectacularly new building with a raft of pictures to explore. The modern town station used by the Preservation Society railway was little more than a kilometre from the gallery, but there was little to see – a platform with empty rail lines stretching towards Moorooduc Station which, we subsequently learned, is the main operational centre for the heritage railway. This is about 10 km out-of-town. The original town station had been in the centre of Mornington and had survived for just on 100 years before closing with the demise of rural rail across the state during the latter part of the 20th century – transport networks that were unable to sustain competition from modern roads, trucking and personal car ownership. The local rail line was closed in 1981 and the central town station and its rail hub immediately became prime commercial building land. Buses replaced the trains – much to the dismay of the travelling public and notwithstanding their naivety/limited vision/nostalgia for times passed. According to contemporary reporting, the Railway Preservation Society was established three years after the demise of the public railway and, by 1991, had a functioning heritage line; providing fun runs at weekends and during school holidays. Development of the original station and central town rail yard resulted in a new shopping complex, service roads, paving and urban gentrification that completely obliterated the 19th historical railway images that once were. Fortuitously, you can still catch a glimpse of those early structures and semi-industrial images courtesy of a couple of information boards, an original name plate from the station and a commemorative plaque (with a photo image c1916 of a building looking much like your local post-office) to one side of the pavement in front of the shopping centre. What would those 19th century engineers/train managers/town citizen time travellers make of the modern cityscape? Historical images, however, are valuable as a reminder of where the settlement started and how the town developed; of the people who once lived and worked there and called the place home. Steam rail is always an attraction – there is something alive about a steam locomotive (that you can’t capture with diesel or electric; it’s a local/people-level technology) and there’s always scope for enhancing this kind of image/memorabilia. For example, what about replacing the information boards with some real street furniture, and update the information boards? Say, with a non-runner locomotive linked to a truck/wagon standing on 20 m of rail - linking the past with the present, boosting civic pride and providing the basis for all manner of school projects. (Check out the photo.) Then it was time to look for Moorooduc Station. It was not the easiest of places to find - hidden in the bush opposite the Coolstores Shopping Centre on the corner of the Moorooduc Hwy and Eramosa Road. We only found it after a circuit of the shopping centre and then returning to the roundabout on the Hwy – there was the signboard in front of us, and directions; head 500 m north on the Hwy and turn left into Mt Eliza Regional Park. Here there’s a gravel road that takes you directly to the station. It was gated - but it’s presumably open when the trains are running. You can also walk through the park to the station, which is what we did. Ten minutes on foot and you arrive at a large open space running parallel to the rail lines, buildings (station, train sheds, etc.), footbridge, tank and peripherals. Everything, crucially, is behind a high wire mesh fence. What you see is what you get: rolling stock - carriages and trucks on rail - parked one behind the other – lots of them. Equipment and structures looked to be in fair condition from the other side of the fence. It was a bright day with good visuals – a pity that the footbridge was not open to Joe Public – it would have provided that view of the entire station and the marshalling yard from above. The railway has four steam and two diesel-powered locomotives (and a rail tractor) according to contemporary reporting, but none were visible through the security fence. Presumably they were stored under cover in the imposing 10x70 m2 train shed/train services/workshop/store building that straddled a couple of rail tracks in the centre of the yard; or elsewhere, perhaps off site? There was no one in attendance, no parked cars and no open gates in the fence. That said, however, (and given the difficulty of finding the place) we considered the afternoon a successful one. It was a pleasure to explore the yard from the side-line and to consider the entire railway in context – forty years after the closure of the public line – living transport history providing interest and entertainment to local communities. Peter Steele 23 August 21

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Peter S
Rome, Italy3,952 contributions
July 2021
Review of Mornington Railways

Well, what did we expect? We’d caught a period in between lockdowns and the Peninsula was there to be explored. It was mid-week and we’d enjoyed half-a-day in Dromana before heading north with the Regional Gallery and the Mornington Railway in Mornington on our bucket list for that afternoon. Sure, the trains would not be running – it’s a difficult time for keeping to schedules with Covid-19 off-the-leash in NSW and over-the-border issues of exposure sites and more in Victoria. We had thought, however, to capture the images of the railway from the stations, perhaps along the line and, crucially, take in any marshalling yards that may be accessible. It didn’t quite work out as expected.
The gallery was easy - there was a friendly custodian at the desk who invited us into what was a spectacularly new building with a raft of pictures to explore.
The modern town station used by the Preservation Society railway was little more than a kilometre from the gallery, but there was little to see – a platform with empty rail lines stretching towards Moorooduc Station which, we subsequently learned, is the main operational centre for the heritage railway. This is about 10 km out-of-town.
The original town station had been in the centre of Mornington and had survived for just on 100 years before closing with the demise of rural rail across the state during the latter part of the 20th century – transport networks that were unable to sustain competition from modern roads, trucking and personal car ownership. The local rail line was closed in 1981 and the central town station and its rail hub immediately became prime commercial building land. Buses replaced the trains – much to the dismay of the travelling public and notwithstanding their naivety/limited vision/nostalgia for times passed.
According to contemporary reporting, the Railway Preservation Society was established three years after the demise of the public railway and, by 1991, had a functioning heritage line; providing fun runs at weekends and during school holidays.
Development of the original station and central town rail yard resulted in a new shopping complex, service roads, paving and urban gentrification that completely obliterated the 19th historical railway images that once were. Fortuitously, you can still catch a glimpse of those early structures and semi-industrial images courtesy of a couple of information boards, an original name plate from the station and a commemorative plaque (with a photo image c1916 of a building looking much like your local post-office) to one side of the pavement in front of the shopping centre.
What would those 19th century engineers/train managers/town citizen time travellers make of the modern cityscape? Historical images, however, are valuable as a reminder of where the settlement started and how the town developed; of the people who once lived and worked there and called the place home.
Steam rail is always an attraction – there is something alive about a steam locomotive (that you can’t capture with diesel or electric; it’s a local/people-level technology) and there’s always scope for enhancing this kind of image/memorabilia. For example, what about replacing the information boards with some real street furniture, and update the information boards? Say, with a non-runner locomotive linked to a truck/wagon standing on 20 m of rail - linking the past with the present, boosting civic pride and providing the basis for all manner of school projects. (Check out the photo.)
Then it was time to look for Moorooduc Station. It was not the easiest of places to find - hidden in the bush opposite the Coolstores Shopping Centre on the corner of the Moorooduc Hwy and Eramosa Road. We only found it after a circuit of the shopping centre and then returning to the roundabout on the Hwy – there was the signboard in front of us, and directions; head 500 m north on the Hwy and turn left into Mt Eliza Regional Park. Here there’s a gravel road that takes you directly to the station. It was gated - but it’s presumably open when the trains are running. You can also walk through the park to the station, which is what we did.
Ten minutes on foot and you arrive at a large open space running parallel to the rail lines, buildings (station, train sheds, etc.), footbridge, tank and peripherals. Everything, crucially, is behind a high wire mesh fence. What you see is what you get: rolling stock - carriages and trucks on rail - parked one behind the other – lots of them. Equipment and structures looked to be in fair condition from the other side of the fence. It was a bright day with good visuals – a pity that the footbridge was not open to Joe Public – it would have provided that view of the entire station and the marshalling yard from above.
The railway has four steam and two diesel-powered locomotives (and a rail tractor) according to contemporary reporting, but none were visible through the security fence. Presumably they were stored under cover in the imposing 10x70 m2 train shed/train services/workshop/store building that straddled a couple of rail tracks in the centre of the yard; or elsewhere, perhaps off site?
There was no one in attendance, no parked cars and no open gates in the fence. That said, however, (and given the difficulty of finding the place) we considered the afternoon a successful one. It was a pleasure to explore the yard from the side-line and to consider the entire railway in context – forty years after the closure of the public line – living transport history providing interest and entertainment to local communities.

Peter Steele
23 August 21
Written 22 August 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Mark P
Melbourne, Australia4 contributions
Nov 2019 • Family
Was great seeing the old trains, my 2 year old daughter loved it. The staff are all very helpful and extremely polite
Written 23 November 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Treane
Cranbourne, Australia42 contributions
May 2019 • Couples
Great experience and well priced. Enjoyed our trip from Moorooduc to Mornington on the 100 year old carriage pulled by a K class steam engine, then a free courtesy bus into town. Wandered around town for a little while, caught the courtesy bus back to Mornington station and then enjoyed our return trip. Thoroughly great day. Volunteers are all friendly and you are welcome onto the loco at Moorooduc station. Will do this again.
Written 9 June 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Colin A
Mt Eliza, Australia17 contributions
Dec 2018 • Family
After boarding the old train carriage at Moorooduc Station, it was like stepping back in time. The train took off and we travelled through woodland forrest, passing the Mount Eliza sports complex until we reached the outskirts of Mornington. A free shuttle bus took us to Mornington for a coffee, etc. Arrived back at the shuttle bus stop in time to board and head back to the train. With a good head of steam we chuffed our way back to Moorooduc Station. A very pleasant way to spend an afternoon with volunteers assisting the whole way.
Written 13 April 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Fae E
Melbourne, Australia195 contributions
June 2018 • Family
An interesting experience. Unfortunately the Steam Engine was not operating, was hauled by vintage diesel, not as interesting, but can understand that taking hours to get steam up for a limited patronage is not on. Friendly people. Rail travel as it was.
Written 12 June 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Maria B
Darwin, Australia34 contributions
Jan 2018 • Family
We took the kids a few days ago and they absolutely loved it. We all loved seeing an old steam train with good old fashioned service. We had our own little cabin in one of the carriages and travelled with the windows opened. The children were so excited. The only downfall was the ride was a little short (round trip from Moorooduc to Mornington but none the less, the children were happy to go on a real train.
Written 8 January 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Rob M
7 contributions
Oct 2017 • Family
Great for railfans and families, We took our boys for a ride from Mooroduc to where the line ends outside of Mornington, I did Learn that trains used to go all the way into town hence it ends where it does, The steam train is fantastic with the steam and the smell of the smoke as you travel along gives you a great insight as how travel was early in the last century. Talking to the friendly volunteers i was told they virtually just had a track and had built all the facilities from scratch, and if you love old stuff you'll have a good time. The ride isn't too long but if you have kids with you it fits in with their attention spans. If your a person who frequents the southern peninsula on day trips sipping latte's and wants to waited on hand and foot this experience may not be to your liking, not really for eco tourists either if you have a disdain for coal fired machinery but that just leaves room for more easy going people on the train. I found Mooroduc station easy to find using the GPS. You'll actually have a great time if realize you are actually going for a steam train ride and research where the train goes to. All up if just want to relax, go for a ride with the kids on a steam train the mornington railway is a lot of fun !
Written 23 December 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Congo_Blue
Geelong, Australia22 contributions
Nov 2017 • Family
Well to be honest, this was one of the worst places we’ve ever had the displeasure of visiting.
It was more poorly signposted than North Korea’s Disneyland, and eventually found off a lay at on the freeway heading out of town.
A Santa special was on offer; Hurrah, we all chimed!
A decent coffee and cake was in mind, but instead, freeze dried tepid coffee served with roadkill sausage in plastic bread. Yum.
Time for ticketing - can’t get any worse, we thought only to then get ripped off by the ticket lady as she apparently didn’t think that two adults and two kids constituted a family. Hmm. Time to get on board the decaying carriage for our journey across the Peninsula.
Once the train had finally departed the carriage proceeded to fill with acrid coal smoke. Santa came along the carriage and ignored us all, threw lollies at this kids and walked off. We assume the fumes had got to him or something stronger perhaps -of which we were all, by now, in need of too.
We arrived within a few minutes to, essentially, The Middle of Nowhere. We stood on the blistering station platform (or more accurately a patch of grass and small hut) for 10 minutes and reboarded, excited by the fact the torment was nearly over.
Fortunately we managed to share a carriage with a considerably large and raucous family of bogans complete with singlets and rude children. hurrah!
We left pleased about the fact that it was all over and only 3 hours of our lives lost.
It’s time to tear up the railway, decant the decrepit rolling stock turn it into Mornington’s new rail trail.
Written 10 December 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

OZtraveller08_8
Port Campbell, Australia160 contributions
July 2017 • Family
It's a relatively short ride from Moorooduc to thx outskirts of Mornington, but a lovely way to remember a bygone era. Our grandchildren thought it was wonderful and I'm full of admiration for the volunteers who have worked hard to preserve this piece of Australian history. Let's hope it's not too long before they can extend the line back to Baxter.
Written 6 September 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Craig H
Melbourne, Australia8 contributions
Apr 2017
Thoroughly enjoyed this trip over Easter. The staff went out of their way to ensure all ages had an enjoyable experience and even thrown in a large Easter Bunny giving out chocolate eggs....which was a complete nightmare for me as I was on a diet. Still took two anyway as would be rude not to :)
Thanks for a great trip.
Written 26 April 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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Mornington Railway: All You Need to Know BEFORE You Go (38 photos)

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