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Athens Shore Excursion: Private City Sightseeing and Acropolis Tour

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    Stop At: Acropolis, via Dionysiou Areopagitou str., Athens 105 58 Greece

    For twenty-five centuries, the panorama of this city is dominated by the rock of the Acropolis. Walk uphill to visit the Acropolis and see the principal buildings: the Propylaia, the Temple of Athena Nike, the Erechtheion and the magnificent Parthenon

    Duration: 1 hour 30 minutes

    Stop At: Parthenon, Acropolis Top of Dionyssiou Areopagitou, Athens 105 58 Greece

    The Parthenon is a former temple on the Athenian Acropolis, Greece, dedicated to the goddess Athena, whom the people of Athens considered their patron. Construction began in 447 BC when the Athenian Empire was at the peak of its power. It was completed in 438 BC, although decoration of the building continued until 432 BC. It is the most important surviving building of Classical Greece, generally considered the zenith of the Doric order. Its decorative sculptures are considered some of the high points of Greek art. The Parthenon is regarded as an enduring symbol of Ancient Greece, Athenian democracy and Western civilization,[6] and one of the world's greatest cultural monuments. To the Athenians who built it, the Parthenon and other Periclean monuments of the Acropolis were seen fundamentally as a celebration of Hellenic victory over the Persian invaders and as a thanksgiving to the gods for that victory

    Duration: 1 hour

    Stop At: Propylaea, Acropolis, Athens 105 58 Greece

    The monumental gateway to the Acropolis, the Propylaea, was one of several public works commissioned by the Athenian leader Pericles in order to rebuild the Acropolis at the conclusion of the Persian Wars. Pericles appointed his friend Phidias as the supervisor and lead architect of this massive project, which Pericles allegedly financed with funds appropriated from the treasury of the Delian League. According to Plutarch, the Propylaea was designed by the architect Mnesicles, about whom nothing else is known.[1] Construction began in 437 BC and was terminated in 432, when the building was still unfinished.

    The Propylaea was constructed of white Pentelic marble and gray Eleusinian marble or limestone, which was used only for accents. Structural iron was also used, though William Bell Dinsmoor[2] analyzed the structure and concluded that the iron weakened the building.

    Duration: 1 hour

    Pass By: Plateia Syntagmatos, Leoforos Vassilissis Amalias, Athens 105 63 Greece

    Syntagma Square is the central square of Athens.The square is named after the Constitution that Otto, the first King of Greece, was obliged to grant after a popular and military uprising on 3 September 1843.It is located in front of the 19th century Old Royal Palace, housing the Greek Parliament since 1934. Syntagma Square is the most important square of modern Athens from both a historical and social point of view, at the heart of commercial activity and Greek politics. The name Syntagma alone also refers to the neighbourhood surrounding the square. In close distance from the Square you can find one of the most busy streets in Athens , Ermou Street, where you can stroll among the great number of shops as well as the coffee & snack places.

    Stop At: Panathenaic Stadium, Vassileos Konstantinou Avenue Vassileos Konstantinou Avenue, 999-20, Athens 999-20 Greece

    The Panathenaic Stadium or Kallimarmaro ( [kaliˈmarmaro], meaning "beautiful marble") is a multi-purpose stadium in Athens, Greece. One of the main historic attractions of Athens,it is the only stadium in the world built entirely of marble.

    A stadium was built on the site of a simple racecourse by the Athenian statesman Lykourgos (Lycurgus) c. 330 BC, primarily for the Panathenaic Games. It was rebuilt in marble by Herodes Atticus, an Athenian Roman senator, by 144 AD and had a capacity of 50,000 seats. After the rise of Christianity in the 4th century it was largely abandoned. The stadium was excavated in 1869 and hosted the Zappas Olympics in 1870 and 1875. After being refurbished, it hosted the opening and closing ceremonies of the first modern Olympics in 1896 and was the venue for 4 of the 9 contested sports. It was used for various purposes in the 20th century and was once again used as an Olympic venue in 2004. It is the finishing point for the annual Athens Classic Marathon.It is also the last venue in Greece from where the Olympic flame handover ceremony to the host nation takes place.

    Duration: 15 minutes

    Pass By: Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, Leoforos Vasilissis Amalias Syntagma Square, Athens 100 28 Greece

    The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier is a war memorial located in Syntagma Square in Athens, in front of the Old Royal Palace. It is a cenotaph dedicated to the Greek soldiers killed during war. It was sculpted between 1930 and 1932 by sculptor Fokion Rok.

    The tomb is guarded by the Evzones of the Presidential Guard.

    Pass By: The Academy of Athens, 28 Panepistimiou Avenue, Athens 106 79 Greece

    The Academy of Athens is Greece's national academy, and the highest research establishment in the country. It was established in 1926, and operates under the supervision of the Ministry of Education. The Academy's main building is one of the major landmarks of Athens.

    Pass By: Arch of Hadrian (Pili tou Adrianou), Leoforos Amalias, Athens Greece

    The Arch of Hadrian, most commonly known in Greek as Hadrian's Gate, is a monumental gateway resembling – in some respects – a Roman triumphal arch. It spanned an ancient road from the center of Athens, Greece, to the complex of structures on the eastern side of the city that included the Temple of Olympian Zeus. It has been proposed that the arch was built to celebrate the adventus (arrival) of the Roman Emperor Hadrian and to honor him for his many benefactions to the city, on the occasion of the dedication of the nearby temple complex in 131 or 132 AD.[1] It is not certain who commissioned the arch, although it is probable that the citizens of Athens or another Greek group were responsible for its construction and design. There were two inscriptions on the arch, facing in opposite directions, naming both Theseus and Hadrian as founders of Athens. While it is clear that the inscriptions honor Hadrian, it is uncertain whether they refer to the city as a whole or to the city in two parts: one old and one new. The early idea, however, that the arch marked the line of the ancient city wall, and thus the division between the old and the new regions of the city, has been shown to be false by further excavation.
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    Important Information
    Departure Point
    Piraeus Port, Athens
    Departure Time
    Tour start time will be adjusted to your ship's arrival. You must contact the local service provider to verify your exact pickup time (contact info will be provided on your confirmation voucher).
    Duration
    4h
    Return Details
    Returns to original departure point
    Inclusions
    • Port pickup and drop-off
    • Professional guide
    • Transport by private vehicle
    • Worry-Free Shore Excursion Guarantee
    Exclusions
    • Gratuities
    • Food and drinks
    • Acropolis of Athens entrance fee (approx. 20 euros)
    • Entry/Admission - Acropolis
    • Entry/Admission - Parthenon
    • Entry/Admission - Propylaea
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    Additional Info
    • Confirmation will be received at time of booking, unless booked within 5 days of travel. In this case confirmation will be received within 48 hours, subject to availability
    • Travelers should have a moderate physical fitness level
    • At time of booking, Cruise Ship passengers must provide the following details under Special Requirements: Ship name, docking time, disembarkation time and re-boarding time
    • Please also enter your preferred pickup time in the Special Requirements box at the time of booking, and reconfirm 48 hours prior to the tour’s departure time
    • This is a private tour/activity. Only your group will participate
    Cancellation Policy
    If you cancel at least 7 days in advance of the scheduled departure, there is no cancellation fee. If you cancel between 3 and 6 day(s) in advance of the scheduled departure, there is a 50 percent cancellation fee. If you cancel within 2 days of the scheduled departure, there is a 100 percent cancellation fee.
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    Reviewed 17 July 2019

    Katarina was a great guide. She was knowledgeable and easy to understand. She knew a LOT! The Parthenon was packed when we went as it had been intermittently closed during the previous week. She got all 8 of us in and out of there with...More

    Date of experience: July 2019
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